Translation of cielo in English:

cielo

m

  • 1 (firmamento) sky cielo cubierto/despejado overcast/clear sky el cielo se está despejando the sky is clearing a cielo abierto [Min] opencast (before n) a cielo descubierto in the open aunque se junten el cielo y la tierra not for all the tea in China cambiar del cielo a la tierra (Chi) to change out of all recognition como caído or llovido del cielo (de manera inesperada) out of the blue (oportunamente) este dinero me viene como caído del cielo this money must be heaven-sent, this money is a godsend poner a algn por los cielos to praise sb to the skies remover cielo y tierra to move heaven and earth taparle a algn el cielo con un harnero (RPl) to pull the wool over sb's eyes tocar el cielo con las manos (AmS) , conseguir ese trabajo es tocar el cielo con las manos that job is way out of my reach o I haven't a hope in hell of getting that job [colloquial/familiar] sentí que tocaba el cielo con las manos I was on cloud nine o over the moon [colloquial/familiar]
  • 2 [Relig] 2.1el cielo (Paraíso) heaven ir al cielo to go to heaven clama al cielo, una injusticia que clama al cielo a gross injustice, an outrage clama al cielo que … it's outrageous o a gross injustice that … estar/sentirse en el séptimo cielo to be in seventh heaven, be over the moon ganarse el cielo to earn oneself a place in heaven ver el cielo abierto to see one's chance 2.2 (Dios) el cielo God quiera el cielo que sea así please God it may be so [literary/literario], let's hope so ¡que el cielo no lo permita! heaven o God forbid! 2.3 (como interj) ¡cielos! good heavens!, heavens! ¡cielo santo! or ¡santo cielo! heavens above!

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.