Translation of contar in English:

contar

vt

  • 2 2.1 (incluir) to count a mí no me cuentes entre sus partidarios don't include me among his supporters lo cuento entre mis mejores amigos I consider him (to be) one of my best friends sin contar al profesor somos 22 there are 22 of us, not counting the teacher y eso sin contar las horas extras and that's without taking overtime into account o/or without including overtime 2.2 (llevar) contaba ya veinte años [formal o literario/formal or literary] she was then twenty years old la asociación cuenta ya medio siglo de vida [formal] the association has now been in existence for half a century [formal]
  • 3 [cuento/chiste/secreto] to tell no se lo cuentes a nadie don't tell anyone cuéntame qué es de tu vida tell me what you've been doing o/or [familiar/colloquial] what you've been up to ¡y a mí me lo vas a contar! [familiar/colloquial] you're telling me! o don't I know! o tell me about it! [familiar/colloquial] abuelito, cuéntame un cuento grandpa, tell me a story es una historia muy larga de contar it's a long story ¡cuéntaselo a tu abuela! [familiar/colloquial] go tell it to the marines! (inglés norteamericano/American English) [familiar/colloquial], , come off it! (inglés británico/British English) [familiar/colloquial] ¿qué cuentas (de nuevo)? [familiar/colloquial] how're things? [familiar/colloquial], what's up? (inglés norteamericano/American English) [familiar/colloquial]

vi

contarse v pron

  • 1.1 [formal] (estar incluido)contarse entre algo se cuenta entre los pocos que tienen acceso she is numbered among the few who have access [formal], she is one of the few people who have access sus partidarios, entre quienes me cuento their supporters, and I count myself as one of them o/or [formal] their supporters, and I number myself among them su nombre se cuenta entre los finalistas her name figures o/or appears among the finalists su novela se cuenta entre las mejores del año his novel is among o/or is numbered among the year's best 1.2¿qué te cuentas? how's it going? [familiar/colloquial], how's things? [familiar/colloquial]

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vt
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Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.