There are 2 translations of cortado in English:

cortado1

(-da)

adj

  • 1 [persona] 1.1[estar] (Esp) (turbado, avergonzado) embarrassed 1.2[estar] (CS) (aturdido) stunned me quedé cortado con la respuesta que me dio I was stunned by her reply, her reply stunned me 1.3[ser] (Esp) (tímido) shy como es tan cortado, no se atrevió a decirle que no being so shy he couldn't bring himself to say no
  • 2[estar] [calle/carretera] closed, closed off la calle está cortada al tráfico the street is closed to traffic carretera cortada por obras road closed (for repairs)
  • 3 3.1 [leche/mayonesa] la leche estaba cortada the milk had curdled, the milk was off o had gone off (BrE) la mayonesa está cortada the mayonnaise is curdled 3.2 [café] with a dash of milk
  • 6 (Chi) [familiar/colloquial] irse cortado (morirse) to drop dead [colloquial/familiar]

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Word of the day lavado
m
wash …
Cultural fact of the day

Did you know that gallego is the language of Galicia, spoken by around 3 million people? It is an official requirement for many official and academic positions, and a compulsory school subject. Galician, a Romance language close to Portuguese, was banned under Franco but with the return to democracy, it became an official language in Galicia beside Castilian. Nowadays there is Galician radio and television, and a considerable amount of publishing. Galician has less social prestige than Catalan and Basque in their homelands. The middle classes have largely opted to use Castilian. See also lenguas cooficiales.

There are 2 translations of cortado in English:

cortado2

m

cortado
  • coffee with a dash of milk

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day lavado
m
wash …
Cultural fact of the day

Did you know that gallego is the language of Galicia, spoken by around 3 million people? It is an official requirement for many official and academic positions, and a compulsory school subject. Galician, a Romance language close to Portuguese, was banned under Franco but with the return to democracy, it became an official language in Galicia beside Castilian. Nowadays there is Galician radio and television, and a considerable amount of publishing. Galician has less social prestige than Catalan and Basque in their homelands. The middle classes have largely opted to use Castilian. See also lenguas cooficiales.