Share this entry

Share this page

cuerpo

Translation of cuerpo in English:

nombre masculino/masculine noun

  • 1 1.1 [Anatomía/Anatomy] body le dolía todo el cuerpo his whole body ached es de cuerpo muy menudo she's very slightly built o/or she has a very slight build tenía el miedo metido en el cuerpo [familiar/colloquial] he was scared stiff [familiar/colloquial] un retrato/espejo de cuerpo entero a full-length portrait/mirror a cuerpo de rey [familiar/colloquial], vive a cuerpo de rey he lives like a king nos atendieron a cuerpo de rey they treated us like royalty, they gave us real V.I.P. treatment [familiar/colloquial] a cuerpo or en or de cuerpo gentil [familiar/colloquial] without a coat ( o/or sweater etc) cuerpo a cuerpo hand-to-hand en un combate cuerpo a cuerpo in hand-to-hand combat dárselo a algn el cuerpo [familiar/colloquial], me lo daba el cuerpo que algo había ocurrido I had a feeling that something had happened echarse algo al cuerpo [familiar/colloquial] [comida] to have sth to eat [bebida] to have sth to drink, knock sth back [familiar/colloquial] en cuerpo y alma [familiar/colloquial] wholeheartedly hacer or ir del cuerpo [eufemístico/euphemistic] to do one's business [eufemístico/euphemistic] hurtarle el cuerpo a algo to dodge sth logró hurtarle el cuerpo al golpe she managed to dodge the blow pedirle el cuerpo algo a algn [familiar/colloquial], como cuando me lo pide el cuerpo I eat when I feel like it el cuerpo le pedía un descanso he felt he had to have a rest, his body was crying out for a rest pintar or retratar a algn de cuerpo entero, en pocas líneas pinta al personaje de cuerpo entero in a few lines she gives you a complete picture of what the character is like eso lo pinta de cuerpo entero that shows him in his true colors, that shows him for what he is sacar(le) el cuerpo a algn (América Latina/Latin America) [familiar/colloquial] to steer clear of sb sacar(le) el cuerpo a algo (América Latina/Latin America) [familiar/colloquial] (a un trabajo) to get out of sth (a una responsabilidad) to evade o/or shirk sth suelto de cuerpo (Cono Sur/Southern Cone) [familiar/colloquial] cool as anything [familiar/colloquial], cool as you like [familiar/colloquial] 1.2 (cadáver) body, corpse allí encontraron su cuerpo sin vida [formal] his lifeless body was found there misa 1.3 (tronco) body

    Compounds

    cuerpo del delito

  • 7 [Imprenta/Printing] point size

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day llanero
m,f
plainsman …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.