There are 2 translations of cursi in English:

cursi1

adj

  • [familiar/colloquial] se cree muy elegante y refinada pero yo la encuentro cursi she thinks she's so chic and refined but she just seems affected to me sus ideas sobre el matrimonio son de lo más cursi her ideas on marriage are terribly romantic and sentimental, she has such twee ideas about marriage (BrE) llevaba unos lacitos en el pelo de lo más cursi she was wearing some horribly prissy o (AmE) cutesy o (BrE) twee little ribbons in her hair tenía la casa decorada de la manera más cursi the decor in his house was terribly chichi o precious o fussy es muy cursilona she's terribly precious o affected o (BrE) twee

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Word of the day vapor
m
vapor (US), vapour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of cursi in English:

cursi2

mf

[familiar/colloquial]
  • es un cursi he's so affected o precious o (BrE) twee

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Word of the day vapor
m
vapor (US), vapour (GB) …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.