Translation of intención in English:

intención

nombre femenino/feminine noun

  • intention no fue mi intención ofenderte I didn't mean to offend you, it was not my intention to offend you ¿qué intenciones trae? what are his intentions? tiene buenas intenciones she's well-intentioned, her intentions are good, she means well tiene malas intenciones he is up to no good lo dijo con segundas intenciones or segunda intención or doble intención she had ulterior motives o/or her own reasons for saying it me preguntó por ella con (mala) intención he asked after her on purpose, he deliberately asked after her sé que lo hacen con la mejor intención I know they're doing it with the best of intentions, I know they mean well lo que cuenta es la intención it's the thought that countsintención de + infinitivo/infinitive vine con (la) intención de ayudarte I came to help you, I came with the intention of helping you, I came intending to help you tiene (la) intención de abrir un bar she plans o/or intends to open a bar no tengo la menor or la más mínima intención de devolvérselo I have no intention whatsoever of giving it back to him, I haven't the slightest intention of giving it back to him de buenas intenciones está empedrado el camino del infierno the road to hell is paved with good intentions

    Compounds

    intención de voto

    • la intención de voto de la mayoría de los encuestados the way that most of the people interviewed intended to vote

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day sigla
f
abbreviation …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.