Translation of juntar in English:

juntar

verbo transitivo/transitive verb

  • 1.1 (unir) [pies/manos/camas] to put … together si juntamos dos mesas, cabremos todos if we put two tables together we'll all be able to fit round como faltó un profesor, juntaron dos clases one teacher was away so they combined two classes o/or put two classes together junta los verdes con los azules put the green ones and the blue ones together 1.2 (reunir) junta las fichas y ponlas en la caja collect up the counters and put them in the box tendrás que juntar fuerzas para decírselo you'll have to pluck up courage to tell him están juntando (dinero) para el viaje they are saving (up) for the trip me va a llevar tiempo juntar el dinero it's going to take me some time to get the money together o/or to raise the money junta monedas/sellos (especialmente América Latina/especially Latin America) she collects coins/stamps 1.3 (cerrar) junta la puerta push the door to

verbo pronominal/pronominal verb (juntarse)

  • 1 [personas] 1.1 (acercarse) to move o/or get closer together júntense más, así salen todos en la foto get (in) o/or move (in) closer together so I can get you all in the picture 1.2 (reunirse) to get together tenemos que juntarnos un día para tomar una copa we must get together for a drink one of these days se juntó con nosotros en Caracas he met up with us o/or joined us in Caracas nos juntamos para comprarle un regalo we got o/or (inglés británico/British English) clubbed together to buy her a present ¡vaya dos que se han juntado! what a pair! 1.3 (relacionarse)juntarse con algn yo no me junto con gente de su calaña I don't mix with her sort se empezó a juntar con malas compañías she fell into bad company no me junto más contigo [lenguaje infantil/child language] I'm not playing with you any more 1.4 (como pareja) no se podían casar, así que se juntaron they couldn't get married so they started living together se volvieron a juntar they got back together again

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.