There are 2 translations of loco in English:

loco1

(-ca)

adj

  • 1 1.1 [Med] [Psic] mad, insane 1.2 (chiflado) crazy [colloquial/familiar], nuts [colloquial/familiar], mad (BrE) [colloquial/familiar] este tipo está medio loco [familiar/colloquial] this guy's not all there [colloquial/familiar], this guy's a bit cracked [colloquial/familiar] ¡pero ustedes están or (AmL) son locos! you must be crazy o mad o insane o out of your mind! [colloquial/familiar] no seas loco, te vas a matar don't be so stupid o foolish, you'll kill yourself eso no lo hago (pero) ni loco there's no way I'd do that, nothing in the world would make me do that o induce me to do that ¿disculparme yo? ¡ni (que estuviera) loco! what, me apologize? not in a million years o no way o never! llenó el formulario a lo loco she completed the form any which way (AmE) o (BrE) any old how [colloquial/familiar] gasta dinero a lo loco he spends money like water o like there's no tomorrow estar loco de remate or de atar [familiar/colloquial] to be stark raving o stark staring mad, to be nutty as a fruitcake [colloquial/familiar], to be completely nuts [colloquial/familiar], to be mad as a hatter (BrE) traer or tener loco a algn (Esp) to be driving sb mad o crazy o up the wall o round the bend [colloquial/familiar] volver loco a algn to drive sb mad o crazy [colloquial/familiar] vuelve locos a los hombres she drives men wild [colloquial/familiar] el chocolate me vuelve loca I adore chocolate, I'm a chocolate addict [colloquial/familiar] volverse loco to go mad este desorden es para volverse loco this mess is enough to drive you crazy [colloquial/familiar] 1.3 (contento, entusiasmado) están locos con el nieto they're besotted with o crazy about their grandchild está loca por él she's mad o crazy o wild about him [colloquial/familiar] está loco por verla/por que le presenten a Laura he's dying o (BrE) mad keen to see her/to be introduced to Laura [colloquial/familiar] es loco por las aceitunas (CS) he's crazy about o mad on olives [colloquial/familiar] 1.4 [familiar/colloquial] (preocupado) worried sick [colloquial/familiar] anda (como) loco con las pruebas he's worried sick about the tests
  • 2 2.1 (indicando gran cantidad) tengo unas ganas locas de verla I'm really looking forward to seeing her, I'm dying to see her [colloquial/familiar] tuvo una suerte loca she was incredibly lucky la obra tuvo un éxito loco the play was hugely successful tienen la guita loca (RPl) [argot/slang] they're rolling in it [colloquial/familiar], they're absolutely loaded [colloquial/familiar] 2.2loco de algo estaba loca de alegría or de contenta she was incredibly happy, she was over the moon (BrE) [colloquial/familiar] está loco de ira/celos he's wild with anger/jealousy estaba loco de dolor he was racked with pain está loca de amor por él she's madly in love with him 2.3 (CS) [familiar/colloquial] (indicando poca cantidad) por cuatro clientes locos que puedan venir, no vamos a abrir it's not worth opening up just for a few odd customers

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of loco in English:

loco2

(-ca)

m,f

  • 1 (enfermo mental) (m) madman; (f) madwoman se puso como un loco al oír la noticia he went crazy o mad when he heard the news maneja or (Esp) conduce como un loco he drives like a madman o lunatic corrimos como locos para alcanzar el autobús [familiar/colloquial] we ran like crazy o mad to catch the bus [colloquial/familiar] gritaba como una loca she was shouting like a madwoman, she was shouting her head off [colloquial/familiar] ¡qué desorganización, esto es de locos! what chaos! this is pure o sheer madness! el loco de Javier se ha venido a pie Javier walked here, madman that he is hoy en día hay mucho loco suelto [familiar/colloquial] there are a lot of loonies o nutcases o weirdos about these days [colloquial/familiar] cada loco con su tema [familiar/colloquial] to each his own, each to his own (BrE) ahora le ha dado por el budismo — cada loco con su tema she's into Buddhism now — oh well, each to his own o [colloquial/familiar] whatever turns you on hacer el loco (Chi) [familiar/colloquial] to make a fool of oneself hacerse el loco to act dumb [colloquial/familiar] no te hagas el loco don't act dumb, don't pretend you haven't seen/heard la loca de la casa [literary/literario] the imagination
  • 3loco m (RPl) [argot/slang] (hombre) guy [colloquial/familiar], bloke (BrE) [colloquial/familiar]

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.