There are 2 translations of pierna in English:

pierna1

f

  • 1.1 [Anat] leg con las piernas cruzadas cross-legged la falda le llega a media pierna the skirt is calf length on her abrirse de piernas (en gimnasia) to do the splits (en sentido sexual) to open o spread one's legs dormir a pierna suelta [familiar/colloquial] to sleep the sleep of the dead estirar las piernas to stretch one's legs hacer piernas (andar) [familiar/colloquial] to have a walk (hacer ejercicio) [familiar/colloquial], to do leg exercises salir por piernas [familiar/colloquial] to take to one's heels, leg it [colloquial/familiar] la mujer honrada, la pierna quebrada y en casa a woman's place is in the home ser pierna (RPl) soy pierna para casi todo I’m ready for just about anything 1.2 [Coc] leg pierna de cordero leg of lamb pierna de vaca round of beef

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of pierna in English:

pierna2

adj inv

  • (RPl) [familiar/colloquial] es un tipo pierna para todo he's the sort of guy who's game for o who's on for o who'll try anything [colloquial/familiar] andá, sé pierna y prestánoslo come on, be a sport and lend it to us

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.