Translation of reducir in English:

reducir

vt

  • 1 1.1 [gastos/costos] to cut, cut down on, reduce; [velocidad] to reduce; [producción/consumo] to reduce hemos reducido el número de casos we have brought down o reduced the number of cases redujeron el número de plazas they cut the number of places o the number of places was reduced han prometido reducir los impuestos they have promised to cut o reduce taxes con esto se intenta reducir al mínimo el riesgo de infección this is intended to minimize o to reduce to a minimum the risk of infection ejercicios para reducir (la) cintura exercises to reduce your waistline reducir algo a algo to reduce sth to sth han reducido el texto a 50 páginas they have shortened o reduced the text to fifty pages le han reducido la pena a dos años they have commuted o shortened o reduced his sentence to two years la población quedó reducida a la mitad the population was reduced to half of its former size reducir algo a su mínima expresión [Mat] to reduce sth to its simplest expression o form el suéter quedó reducido a su mínima expresión [humorous/humorístico] the sweater shrank to nothing reducir algo en algo to reduce sth by sth pretenden reducir el gasto en cinco millones they aim to reduce costs by five million 1.2 [fotocopia/fotografía] to reduce

vi

reducirse v pron

  • reducirse a algo todo se reduce a saber interpretar las cifras it all comes down to knowing how to interpret the figures todo se redujo a una visita a la catedral y un paseo por el río in the end it was just a visit to the cathedral and a walk along the river

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.