Translation of tapar in English:

tapar

verbo transitivo/transitive verb

  • 1 (cubrir) [caja] to put the lid on; [botella/frasco] to put the top on; [olla] to cover, put the lid on tapé bien el agua I put the top tightly on the water (bottle) tapó los muebles con unas sábanas viejas she covered the furniture with some old sheets cuélgalo ahí y así tapa la mancha hang it there, that way it'll cover (up) the stain le tapó la boca para que no gritara he put his hand over her mouth so that she wouldn't scream la bufanda le tapaba parte de la cara the scarf covered o/or hid part of his face

verbo intransitivo/intransitive verb

verbo pronominal/pronominal verb (taparse)

  • 1 (reflexivo/reflexive) (cubrirse) se tapó la cara con las manos he covered his face with his hands tápate la garganta, que vas a coger frío put something around your neck; you'll catch cold se metió en la cama y se tapó bien he got into bed and covered himself up si sales, tápate bien que hace frío wrap up well o/or warm if you're going out, it's cold
  • 2 2.1 [oídos/nariz] (+ me/te/le etc) to get o/or become blocked cada vez que viajo en avión se me tapan los oídos every time I fly, my ears get blocked tengo la nariz tapada my nose is blocked 2.2 (América Latina/Latin America) [caño/excusado] to get blocked

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.