Definition of Arcadian in English:

Arcadian

Syllabification: Ar·ca·di·an
Pronunciation: /ärˈkādēən
 
/

noun

1A native of Arcadia.
More example sentences
  • Late in the year he went to the aid of the Arcadians, and was largely responsible for the crucial decision to press on with the invasion of the Spartan homeland - the first in historical times - and, above all, to free Messenia.
  • I mean, it's from the Amorites and from the Arcadians even earlier that we have the Semitic language coming in, which is the basis for Phoenician, for Aramaic, for Hebrew and for the Arabic languages.
  • Now that Spartan backing was no longer a guarantee of political ascendancy, one Euphron, who had previously exploited Spartan favour, persuaded the Argives and Arcadians to help him install democracy.
1.1 literary An idealized country dweller.
More example sentences
  • I assure you, Mr. Dombey, Nature intended me for an Arcadian.
  • Gallus, is never represented as a shepherd or true Arcadian.
  • Pastoral vagrancy, indeed, may be said to be the badge of all these tribes; but not theirs were the pastoral virtues of orthodox and legitimate Arcadians.

adjective

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1Of or relating to Arcadia.
More example sentences
  • They tended to disguise them on Italianate terraces surrounded by Tivoli garden stone statues, or site them in specially-built pool houses, where they were inevitably accompanied by Roman columns and Arcadian murals.
  • And they raise two plastic cups of Scotch in a conciliatory toast ‘to the Arcadian dream‘.
  • Even if we are less hopeful in the twenty-first century, perhaps we still need to have Arcadian dreams and where better to explore them than in ‘God's own Country’.
1.1 literary Of or relating to an ideal rustic paradise.
More example sentences
  • Another strain on the Arcadian ideal in the late 1930s came from the haste with which war seemed about to repeat itself, a haste that wrought havoc with the archetypal narrative of loss and recovery.
  • The ‘fancy pictures’, Arcadian rustic themes like the Peasant Girl Gathering Sticks, led on to the sentiment of early Romanticism.
  • The prospect thus stands in direct, temporal opposition to the pastoral or Arcadian mode.

Origin

late 16th century: from Latin Arcadius, from Greek Arkadia (see Arcadia).

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Pronunciation: ˈgəzəl
verb
eat or drink (something) greedily