Definition of Gloria in English:

Gloria

Syllabification: Glo·ri·a
Pronunciation: /ˈɡlôrēə
 
/

noun

1A Christian liturgical hymn or formula beginning (in the Latin text) with Gloria, in particular.
More example sentences
  • Sometimes the entire congregation sang the Gloria, sometimes a choir or soloists.
  • They sang the Gloria in Excelsis antiphonally, dividing the lines between high and low voices.
  • Thus, the reader should say the antiphon, followed by the canticle, then the Gloria Patri, and then the antiphon again.
1.1The hymn beginning Gloria in excelsis Deo (Glory be to God in the highest), forming a set part of the Mass.
More example sentences
  • At midnight mass we blasted out the Kyries, Glorias and Sanctus’, sometimes in three-part harmony.
  • All four have six sections: they open with a choral Kyrie and continue with a Gloria in which three solo arias are framed by two choruses with full choir and instrumental complement.
  • When the Ministers have said the Gloria at the altar, they go to sit in the sanctuary until the choir has finished singing.
1.2A musical setting of this: Vivaldi’s Gloria
More example sentences
  • The overall feel of the Gloria is joyful, echoed by overwhelming preference of major tonalities over minor in this setting.
  • It includes mass movements (all Glorias or Credos), motets, and a variety of secular songs in French and Italian.
1.3The doxology beginning Gloria Patris (Glory be to the Father), used after psalms and in formal prayer (e.g., in the rosary).
More example sentences
  • If it is to be said, the Gloria</en> now follows: Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
  • In fact, after the priest silently said the Gloria or Credo he would sit down until the music was finished.

Origin

Middle English: Latin, 'glory'.

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