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Sapir–Whorf hypothesis

Syllabification: Sa·pir–Whorf hy·poth·e·sis
Pronunciation: /səˌpirˈ(h)wôrf hīˌpäTHəsəs
 
/

Definition of Sapir–Whorf hypothesis in English:

noun

Linguistics
A hypothesis, first advanced by Edward Sapir in 1929 and subsequently developed by Benjamin Whorf, that the structure of a language determines a native speaker’s perception and categorization of experience.
Example sentences
  • Soccer may be the simplest and most universal sport, but the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis shows how language causes people around the world to see the game very differently.

Definition of Sapir–Whorf hypothesis in:

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