Definition of ablative in English:

ablative

Syllabification: ab·la·tive
Pronunciation: /ˈablətiv
 
/

adjective

[attributive]
1 Grammar Relating to or denoting a case (especially in Latin) of nouns and pronouns (and words in grammatical agreement with them) indicating separation or an agent, instrument, or location.
More example sentences
  • Indeed, the nominal part of this prepositional phrase is not in the nominative case; sub governs the ablative case.
  • My Mongolian had got as far as the ablative case and the important greeting noxhoi-khoi, ‘hold the dog’.
  • Of the six Indo-European cases capable of being governed by adpositions, the ablative and genitive singular were not distinguished outside of o-stems.
2(Of surgical treatment) involving ablation.
More example sentences
  • For ablative treatment procedures other than cryotherapy, local anesthesia with topical or injected lidocaine should be used.
  • It may be wise to biopsy all ‘warts’ before ablative treatment.
  • Disease limited to the liver is suitable for surgical resection or ablative techniques.
3Of, relating to, or subject to ablation through melting or evaporation: the spacecraft’s ablative heat shield
More example sentences
  • The craft survived the journey with a rounded, blunt heat shield covered with ablative material, which evaporated away to dissipate heat.
  • This heat shield is covered by an insulating layer protected by an ablative material in contact with the hot plasma flow.
  • Protected by an ablative thermal shield, the probe will decelerate to 400 metres per second.

noun

Grammar Back to top  
1A word in the ablative case.
More example sentences
  • I don't see why the word couldn't be used for hairless, though I'll admit it might be more usual to have an ablative of respect in there somewhere.
  • No, I think I mean loco, from the Latin ablative for locus, meaning place.
  • Thinking of ablatives as Latin's version of English adverbial clauses and phrases may help you.
1.1 (the ablative) The ablative case.
More example sentences
  • Mention one example each of verbs followed by the nominative, the accusative, the genitive, the dative, the ablative.
  • The nominal system distinguishes five cases: nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, and ablative.
  • Classical Mongolian had seven cases: nominative, accusative, dative, genitive, ablative, instrumental, and comitative.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French ablative (feminine of ablatif), Latin ablativus, from ablat- 'taken away' (see ablation).

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Pronunciation: əˈnämələs
adjective
deviating from what is standard, normal, or expected