Definition of abolish in English:

abolish

Syllabification: a·bol·ish
Pronunciation: /əˈbäliSH
 
/

verb

[with object]

Derivatives

abolisher

noun
More example sentences
  • The Bad Guys were the European Union, the sexual liberals, the would-be abolishers of the pound and the Bureaucrats.
  • I suppose they did not think that, having been published before the deluge, it could have safely survived that world-wide calamity, the abolisher of all things.
  • But Ms Witheford, wary of having the ARM branded as abolishers of holidays, promised that when Australia became a republic the ARM would recommend a Republic Day holiday to be held on the anniversary of that frabjous day.

abolishment

noun
More example sentences
  • They demanded the abolishment of Ministry of Education Decree No.501 / 1993, which obliges female students not to cover their ears with their headscarves when taking photographs for their school IDs.
  • And I would like the abolishment of the offside rule.
  • Largely in this tradition, Marx believed that differences in economic wealth are the ultimate cause of human misfortune, and therefore needed abolishment, along with class society.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French aboliss-, lengthened stem of abolir, from Latin abolere 'destroy'.

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Pronunciation: skōSH
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a small amount; a little