Definition of abrogate in English:

abrogate

Syllabification: ab·ro·gate
Pronunciation: /ˈabrəˌgāt
 
/

verb

[with object] formal

Derivatives

abrogation

Pronunciation: /ˌabrəˈgāSHən/
noun
More example sentences
  • The courts accept that abrogation of these privileges can only be made by statute but nonetheless there is considerable scope for judicial definition of limits.
  • It would depend on the detailed operation of the law and it is most unlikely that a blanket abrogation of legal professional privilege would survive.
  • The administration's arguments justifying the wholesale abrogation of civil liberties are by no means limited to an emergency response to an immediate threat.
Synonyms
repeal, revocation, repudiation, rescinding, overturning, annulment, overruling, cancellation, invalidation, nullification, negation, dissolution, discontinuation; reversal, retraction, removal, withdrawal, abolition
formal rescission
rare deracination

Origin

early 16th century: from Latin abrogat- 'repealed', from the verb abrogare, from ab- 'away, from' + rogare 'propose a law'.

Usage

The verbs abrogate and arrogate are quite different in meaning. While abrogate means ‘repeal (a law),’ arrogate means ‘take or claim (something) for oneself without justification,’ often in the structure arrogate something to oneself , as in the emergency committee arrogated to itself whatever powers it chose .

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