Definition of allegory in English:

allegory

Syllabification: al·le·go·ry
Pronunciation: /ˈaləˌgôrē
 
/

noun (plural allegories)

1A story, poem, or picture that can be interpreted to reveal a hidden meaning, typically a moral or political one: Pilgrim’s Progress is an allegory of the spiritual journey
More example sentences
  • It can, and has, also been interpreted as an allegory of the political, economic and social adventures of the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries.
  • At a news conference, Lucas acknowledged the political allegories of the saga, which could have contemporary resonance although he wrote it at the time of the Nixon era.
  • My first response upon rereading the book, largely thanks to my current preoccupations, was to interpret the story as an allegory about writing fiction.
Synonyms
parable, analogy, metaphor, symbol, emblem
1.1A symbol.
More example sentences
  • He mediates through symbols, metaphors, allegories and metonymy to transmute his experiences of the phenomenal world.
  • But then comes the coded ending, and you realize that Bagger is a symbol, an allegory, a pillar of life, death and whatever else.
  • Your dreams are full of symbols and allegories.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French allegorie, via Latin from Greek allēgoria, from allos 'other' + -agoria 'speaking'.

Derivatives

allegorist

noun
More example sentences
  • The Christian allegorists, recharging the remaindered Pagan symbols, hope to exorcise the residual energies of the pagan world.
  • Kafka wrongly gets posited as a political or humanitarian allegorist, when his stories are rather personal series of images and processes that cannot be conclusively unlocked.
  • Allegorical imagery is appropriated imagery; the allegorist does not invent images but confiscates them.

Definition of allegory in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day guzzle
Pronunciation: ˈgəzəl
verb
eat or drink (something) greedily