Definition of amiable in English:

amiable

Syllabification: a·mi·a·ble
Pronunciation: /ˈāmēəbəl
 
/

adjective

Derivatives

amiably

adverb
More example sentences
  • In such cases where feelings run deep, problems unsolved can generally be ignored amicably and amiably.
  • She was rather surprised, but gave me directions amiably enough.
  • For a few pages everything moves along amiably enough.

amiableness

noun
More example sentences
  • Natural amiableness is too often seen in company with sloth, with uselessness, with the vanity of fashionable life.
  • Mr. Knightley expressed his disapproval of Frank's behavior and Emma's vision of him by contrasting what he called French amiableness with English amiableness.
  • The images, varying in scale, approach and depiction, present a range of emotions and attitudes, all traveling forward to the next era with various degrees of purpose, amiableness and likelihood.

Origin

late Middle English (originally in the senses 'kind' and 'lovely, lovable'): via Old French from late Latin amicabilis 'amicable'. The current sense, influenced by modern French aimable 'trying to please', dates from the mid 18th century.

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