There are 3 definitions of Angle in English:

Angle

Syllabification: An·gle
Pronunciation: /ˈaNGgəl
 
/

noun

  • A member of a Germanic people, originally inhabitants of what is now Schleswig-Holstein, who migrated to England in the 5th century ad. The Angles founded kingdoms in Mercia, Northumbria, and East Anglia and gave their name to England and the English.
    More example sentences
    • But her report says the citadel ‘puts Stirling firmly on the map at a time when Picts, Scots, Britons and Angles ruled their separate kingdoms in the four quarters of mainland Scotland’.
    • In the eleventh century, the Scottish kingdom was a politico-ethnic patchwork of Scots, Picts, Angles, and Britons.
    • The collapse of Roman rule in the early fifth century ended urban life, as groups of Germanic Angles, Jutes, and Saxons carved the country into tribal enclaves and later created the heptarchy.

Origin

from Latin Anglus, (plural) Angli 'the people of Angul', a district of Schleswig (now in northern Germany), so called because of its shape; of Germanic origin, related to Old English angul (see angle2). Compare with English.

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Word of the day kerf
Pronunciation: kərf
noun
a slit made by cutting with a saw

There are 3 definitions of Angle in English:

angle1

Syllabification: an·gle
Pronunciation: /ˈaNGgəl
 
/

noun

  • 1The space (usually measured in degrees) between two intersecting lines or surfaces at or close to the point where they meet.
    More example sentences
    • Bend your elbows at 90-degree angles and keep them close to your body.
    • The curve value is the number of degrees formed by the angle of intersection of these perpendiculars.
    • Extension involves the triceps muscle, and when fully extended the arm should be in a straight line - the elbow angle at 180 degrees.
  • 1.1A corner, especially an external projection or an internal recess of a part of a building or other structure: a skylight in the angle of the roof
    More example sentences
    • Scrim joints at internal and external angles (except where coincident with a metal bead).
    • With its metal projections and angles, wooden recesses and thin walls it has a serendipitous quality.
    • Exposed structure, unusual angles, and leaning walls give the building a noninstitutional energy.
    Synonyms
    corner, intersection, point, apex
  • 1.2Slope; a measure of the inclination of two lines or surfaces with respect to each other, equal to the amount that one would have to be turned in order to point in the same direction as the other: sloping at an angle of 33° to the horizontal he trudged back, the angle of his shoulders spelling dejection
    More example sentences
    • Ice surface slope angles were measured using a surveyor's clinometer.
    • The helical axis was tilted by an angle of 35° with respect to the central plane.
    • For example, at each location on the globe, the geomagnetic field lines intersect the Earth's surface at a specific angle of inclination.
    Synonyms
  • 1.3A position from which something is viewed or along which it travels or acts, often as measured by its inclination from an implicit horizontal or vertical baseline: from this angle, Maggie could not see Naomi’s face camera angles
    More example sentences
    • Horizontal and vertical viewing angles are also fairly poor, with the screen looking washed out at you move up and down and going dark as you move to the side.
    • The game uses both first- and third-person camera angles to view the action.
    • He's a master of visual flash, positioning cameras at myriad angles to enhance every car crash, explosion or close-up gun shot.
  • 2A particular way of approaching or considering an issue or problem: discussing the problems from every conceivable angle he always had a fresh angle on life
    More example sentences
    • For me, I guess the core reason was ‘fascination’ - things firing my imagination and integrating that with my angle on approaching the world.
    • Clay considers a new angle on the control of community structure.
    • Whatever the issue of the day's, he's got an angle on it.
    Synonyms
  • 2.1One part of a larger subject, event, or problem: a black prosecutor who downplayed the racial angle his chosen angle was the language of the Old Testament
    More example sentences
    • It is patronising and unnecessary, and you sincerely wish that commentators would stop trying to find a British angle to sell the event to viewers.
    • Also, I know you keep raising the racial angle, preferring to not deal with the fact that his critics are black.
    • Becky was of mixed race, and the case appears to have a racial angle.
  • 2.2A bias or point of view: Zimmer saw the world from an angle that few could understand
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    • This kind of angle - ‘bias’ is the more common word - is one that has no legitimate place in journalism.
    • You need to step back and view this from another angle.
    • Viewed from one angle, he is a haunted melancholic, pursued like a figure out of Poe by the implacable demons of childhood hurt.
  • 3 [often with modifier] Astrology Each of the four mundane houses (the first, fourth, seventh, and tenth of the twelve divisions of the heavens) that extend counterclockwise from the cardinal points of the compass.
    More example sentences
    • The horary chart had fixed signs on all four angles.
    • The Midheaven, or MC is one of the most important angles in the birth chart.
    • Each quadrant is then bound by two of the four angles of the horoscope.
  • 4Angle iron or a similar construction material made of another metal.
    More example sentences
    • Usually, the steel angle or steel lintel is below the stone surround.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
  • 1Direct or incline at an angle: Anna angled her camera toward the tree he angled his chair so that he could watch her
    More example sentences
    • Then, angling her flashlight to direct the beam ahead of her, she carefully inspected the wall to her right until she found a hole the size of a nickel disguised in the carvings.
    • And don't angle that camera up to those high ceilings - I haven't figured out how to get up there with the roller brush yet.
    • She rolled her eyes and wondered why she even asked when she saw him standing a little further away, angling his camera for a shot.
    Synonyms
    tilt, slant, direct, turn
  • 1.1 [no object] Move or be inclined at an angle: the cab angled across two lanes and skidded to a stop the sun angled into the dining room
    More example sentences
    • Her red hair gleamed in the light of the late afternoon sun angling down into the courtyard.
    • But when the soap-opera sun rose, it angled to the left.
    • Adriana judged they were moving eastward, by hints of the sun that angled down through the high canopy of branches.
  • 1.2Present (information) to reflect a particular view or have a particular focus.
    More example sentences
    • Our news stories will be angled differently, and the upside of having lots of media publications is that many angles get covered.
    • It soon became apparent what the 16PF questions were angled towards, and some of the multiple choice replies were quite restrictive.
    Synonyms
    present, slant, orient, twist, bias

Phrases

at an angle

In a direction or at an inclination markedly different from parallel, vertical, or horizontal with respect to an implicit baseline: she wore her beret at an angle an armchair was drawn up at an angle to his desk
More example sentences
  • The man tilted the book upwards at an angle so I couldn't see the contents and turned back the cover.
  • It would start off tilted at an angle and would gradually straighten up as the glasses filled.
  • Other versions attach to the wall or descend from the ceiling vertically or at an angle.

from all angles

From every direction or point of view: they come shooting at us from all angles looking at the problem from all angles
More example sentences
  • Killian and Thomas Tallon were about to board Killian Dad's boat to view the Seagull II from all angles.
  • Experienced correspondents will not spout the other side's view, they will assess the story from all angles.
  • Plant to one side or the other, looking at the new tree from all angles to make sure it looks good from every direction.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French, from Latin angulus 'corner'.

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Definition of angle in:

There are 3 definitions of Angle in English:

angle2

Syllabification: an·gle
Pronunciation: /
 
ˈaNGgəl/

verb

[no object]
  • 1Fish with rod and line: there are no big fish left to angle for
    More example sentences
    • Salmon and sardine would be better fish to angle for.
    • For the urban poor, the storm waters bring a unique opportunity to angle for fish in the swollen canals criss-crossing the city.
    • This piece of kit is obviously designed for world-wide distribution and seems to be the ideal tool for all lure anglers whether they angle in salt or fresh-water.
  • 1.1Seek something desired by indirectly prompting someone to offer it: Ralph had begun to angle for an invitation [with infinitive]: her husband was angling to get into the Cabinet
    More example sentences
    • After spending the last two seasons angling for a move the Premiership his form and free transfer status instead look to have led him to La Liga champions Barcelona.
    • O'Neal never has angled to have a say in personnel moves, but he's not happy with the quality of the players around him.
    • From Russia to Libya to Venezuela, investment terms and tax regimes are becoming less favorable as governments angle for a bigger cut of the oil wealth.
    Synonyms
    try to get, seek to obtain, fish for, hope for, be after

noun

archaic Back to top  
  • A fishhook.

Origin

Old English angul (noun); the verb dates from late Middle English.

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