Definition of antinomy in English:

antinomy

Syllabification: an·tin·o·my
Pronunciation: /anˈtinəmē
 
/

noun (plural antinomies)

A contradiction between two beliefs or conclusions that are in themselves reasonable; a paradox.
More example sentences
  • According to Kant, antinomies are not genuine contradictions, since both of the propositions that constitute them are false, being based on a false assumption.
  • Thus, Frege himself concluded that the antinomy was due to unclarities in the symbolism Russell used to formulate the paradox.
  • Although the result is a non-standard account of geometry as an inexact science, Hume thinks that he thereby preserves reason from otherwise irresolvable antinomies.

Origin

late 16th century (in the sense 'a conflict between two laws'): from Latin antinomia, from Greek, from anti 'against' + nomos 'law'.

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Word of the day apposite
Pronunciation: ˈapəzit
adjective
apt in the circumstances or relation to something