There are 2 definitions of beguine in English:

beguine1

Syllabification: be·guine
Pronunciation: /biˈgēn
 
/

noun

A popular dance of West Indian origin, similar to the foxtrot.
More example sentences
  • Spike wrote: ‘We present a very colourful act in rhumba costume and our numbers comprise sambas, beguines, rhumbas etc.’
  • She refused to begin the beguine when they besought her to
  • Like many Latin dances, the beguine emphasizes the ability to roll the hips while stepping, evoking sensuality.

Origin

1930s: from West Indian French, from French béguin 'infatuation'.

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Word of the day grammarian
Pronunciation: grəˈme(ə)rēən
noun
a person who studies and writes about grammar

There are 2 definitions of beguine in English:

beguine2

Syllabification: beg·uine
Pronunciation: /ˈbegēn, ˈbāˌgēn, bəˈgēn
 
/

noun

(In the Roman Catholic Church) a member of a lay sisterhood in the Low Countries, not bound by vows.
More example sentences
  • Mechthild of Magdeburg was a member of a Beguine community.
  • In a fascinating appendix he profiles some Beguine women who had associations with the Spirituals, and throughout the text he warns against a tendency to see every upholder of evangelical poverty as either a heretic or even a Spiritual.

Origin

late 15th century: Old French béguine, medieval Latin beguīna, from the name of Lambert Bègue or le Bègue (‘the Stammerer’), a 12th-century priest who founded the order.

More definitions of beguine

Definition of beguine in:

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Word of the day grammarian
Pronunciation: grəˈme(ə)rēən
noun
a person who studies and writes about grammar