There are 3 definitions of bogey in English:

bogey1

Syllabification: bo·gey
Pronunciation: /ˈbōɡē
 
/
Golf

noun (plural bogeys)

1A score of one stroke over par at a hole.
More example sentences
  • He got back into contention with a level par 71 containing six birdies, four bogeys and one double bogey.
  • DiMarco, tied for the lead after the first round, had an inconsistent round that included an eagle, four birdies, three bogeys and a double bogey.
  • He was six over after the first seven holes after a run of four bogeys compounded by a double bogey on the sixth.
1.1 archaic term for par1 (sense 1) of the noun).

verb (bogeys, bogeying, bogeyed)

[with object] Back to top  
Play (a hole) in one stroke over par.
More example sentences
  • Brewer told a story about Rosburg leading a tournament in Portland, but then the next day bogeying the first hole, double-bogeying the second before walking off the course in disgust.
  • Evans, who missed out on last year's play-off by bogeying the final hole at Muirfield, took full advantage of his favourable early start to finish with a level par 71.
  • I hobbled into the clubhouse after bogeying the hole and shooting my first 79.

Origin

late 19th century: perhaps from Bogey, denoting the Devil (see bogey2), regarded as an imaginary player.

Definition of bogey in:

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Word of the day epyllion
Pronunciation: əˈpilēən
noun
a narrative poem resembling an epic in style...

There are 3 definitions of bogey in English:

bogey2

Syllabification: bo·gey
Pronunciation: /ˈbo͝oɡē
 
/
(also bogy)

noun (plural bogeys)

1A person or thing that causes fear or alarm: the bogey of recession
More example sentences
  • The bogey of community in peril was falsely raised to keep the constituency within the preserve of male candidates.
  • So Ryle's fundamental target is not the Cartesian hypothesis of the ghost in the machine: it is ‘the bogy of mechanism’, mistaken fear of which leads people to embrace the Cartesian hypothesis.
  • Of course, any such attempt is constrained by the spectre of a nuclear war, whose bogey is very calculatingly turned off and on by the country's government officials.
1.1An evil or mischievous spirit.
More example sentences
  • Surely there can be no better way to interest young children in science than talking bogeys.
  • There were Ghosts, plain and simple: mere bogies, fully conscious of their own decay, who had accepted the traditional role of the spectre, and seemed to hope they could frighten someone.
  • But at the Reformation, this interpretation was forbidden, and a bogey henceforth could only be a bogey, never a ghost.
1.2US military slang An enemy aircraft.
More example sentences
  • When escorting, maintain a tight weave over your formation when bogies are sighted.
  • In the 1970s the Texas Guard, part of the North American Air Defense Command, also regularly scrambled fighters to intercept unknown bogies headed toward the US over the Gulf of Mexico.
  • In fact, I can't even recall hearing them called Soviets or Russians or anything that would identify them; all we get are references to MiGs and bogies.

Origin

mid 19th century (as a proper name applied to the Devil): of unknown origin; probably related to bogle.

Definition of bogey in:

There are 3 definitions of bogey in English:

bogey3

Line breaks: bogey
Pronunciation: /ˈbəʊɡi/

Entry from British & World English dictionary

noun

Australian informal
An act of swimming or bathing.

Origin

mid 19th century: from Dharuk bu-gi 'to swim'.

Definition of bogey in: