Share this entry

Share this page

bombard

Syllabification: bom·bard

Definition of bombard in English:

verb

Pronunciation: /bämˈbärd
 
/
[with object]
1Attack (a place or person) continuously with bombs, shells, or other missiles: the city was bombarded by federal forces supporters bombarded police with bottles
More example sentences
  • Further north, Tomahawk missiles bombarding the city heralded the beginning of the War.
  • Two years ago, the major part of the war was all about bombarding us with smart bombs and high-tech missiles.
  • One answer of course might be for the Allies to bombard the railway tracks leading to the death camps.
Synonyms
shell, pound, blitz, strafe, bomb;
assail, attack, assault, batter, blast, pelt
1.1Assail (someone) persistently, as with questions, criticisms, or information: they will be bombarded with complaints
More example sentences
  • We are bombarded with information every waking moment!
  • I'm bombarded with questions and statements and doubts and sympathy.
  • From day one we are now bombarded with information like never before.
Synonyms
1.2 Physics Direct a high-speed stream of particles at (a substance).
Example sentences
  • A young scientist named Henry Moseley experimented with bombarding atoms of different elements with x rays.
  • The experimenters bombarded a thin gold foil with alpha particles (helium atoms without electrons).
  • These men experimented by bombarding uranium with neutrons.

noun

Pronunciation: /ˈbämˌbärd
 
/
historical Back to top  
A cannon of the earliest type, which originally fired a stone ball.
Example sentences
  • Yet for all the muskets, bombards, and cannon, Kelly appears more interested in the impact of gunpowder as a technological force driving deeper societal changes.
  • Early siege cannon, or bombards, were heavy and rested in a static mount.
  • In a short time, these small and ineffective weapons developed into massive bombards.

Origin

late Middle English (as a noun denoting an early form of cannon, also a shawm): from Old French bombarde, probably based on Latin bombus 'booming, humming' (see bomb). The verb (late 16th century) is from French bombarder.

Definition of bombard in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day cumbersome
Pronunciation: ˈkəmbərsəm
adjective
large or heavy and therefore difficult to carry…