There are 4 main definitions of bound in English:

bound1

Syllabification: bound
Pronunciation: /bound
 
/

verb

[no object]
1Walk or run with leaping strides: Louis came bounding down the stairs the dog bounded up to him
More example sentences
  • Sally bounded up to him when he walked into the building alone the next morning.
  • We do not know who won the high jump or the triple jump except that a couple of Swedes have gone bounding down the track in delight.
  • Valentine sensed the relaxed atmosphere and bounded up to Aimée, jumping up on her.
Synonyms
1.1(Of an object, typically a round one) rebound from a surface: bullets bounded off the veranda
More example sentences
  • Painter Henri Matisse had rooms overlooking the market, and you could see where he got his inspiration as the sunlight bounded off ochre walls in these tall, narrow streets.
  • The ball bounded off the wall and Jeter went into second standing up.
  • I didn't glance up from my plate until a roll bounded off the side of my head.

noun

Back to top  
A leaping movement upward: I went up the steps in two effortless bounds
More example sentences
  • Water was run across, buildings were leapt in a single bound, swords made appropriately dramatic sounds as they were sliced through the air.
  • But only recently have videogames started making leaps and bounds towards a unified interactive product.
  • In a single bound, he leaped over a Texas blocker to force a game-sealing interception earlier this year.
Synonyms

Origin

early 16th century (as a noun): from French bond (noun), bondir (verb) 'resound', later 'rebound', from late Latin bombitare, from Latin bombus 'humming'.

Definition of bound in:

There are 4 main definitions of bound in English:

bound2

Syllabification: bound
Pronunciation: /bound
 
/

noun

(often bounds)
1A territorial limit; a boundary: the ancient bounds of the forest
More example sentences
  • We elves patrol throughout the Black Wood, and well into the bounds of the ancient elf kingdom, including the Marshes where you are from.
  • I do not need to take it any further than to merely say there is a broad power and it can operate beyond the bounds of the Territory.
  • The bounds of the territorium, described topographically, match the present Llangors parish.
1.1A limitation or restriction on feeling or action: it is not beyond the bounds of possibility that the issue could arise again enthusiasm to join the union knew no bounds
More example sentences
  • My only limits are the bounds of good taste, what I consider good taste.
  • His ambition for approbation sets bounds and limits to his ambition, so to speak.
  • By contrast, hoarding of a non-monetary commodity is kept within bounds by declining marginal utility.
1.2 technical A limiting value.
More example sentences
  • For example, the usual definition of least upper bound is impredicative, since it characterizes a number in terms of a collection of upper bounds, and the defined number is a member of that collection.
  • Schofield and then McKelvey and Schofield obtained some bounds on k values.
  • Researchers can therefore use calibrated and uncalibrated models to provide upper and lower bounds to capture true values.

verb

[with object] (usually be bounded) Back to top  
1Form the boundary of; enclose: the ground was bounded by a main road on one side and a meadow on the other
More example sentences
  • Oval in plan, the enclosure is bounded by a single stone wall 2.7 m. thick.
  • It is 120 feet long and 45 feet wide, is enclosed by cut stone granite walls and bounded by mature trees.
  • The site is bounded by fencing, hedges and trees, and fences divide most of the plots.
Synonyms
1.1Place within certain limits; restrict: freedom of action is bounded by law
More example sentences
  • The only legitimate and productive political action must be bounded by the limits of the status quo and the Democrats who protect it.
  • In terms of the product continuum, they have enabled users to personalise their trainers, creating designs and patterns within a tightly bounded shoe design.
  • Symphonic music was, and still is, bounded only by the limits of the imagination.
Synonyms
limit, restrict, confine, circumscribe, demarcate, delimit

Origin

Middle English (in the senses 'landmark' and 'borderland'): from Old French bodne, from medieval Latin bodina, earlier butina, of unknown ultimate origin.

Phrases

in bounds

Sports Inside the regular playing area.
More example sentences
  • This way, when I pass the ball in bounds, the defense has to find their man and react to the situation.
  • Replays showed Johnson landed two feet in bounds.
  • Why shouldn't replay help decide whether he didn't land in bounds because of the tackle or because of his own momentum?

out of bounds

Sports Outside the regular playing area: he hit his third shot out of bounds at the 17th
More example sentences
  • She then appeared to lose a step, dropping four straight games during a stretch when she double-faulted three times and saw her long ground strokes carry out of bounds on the clay court.
  • Instead, the former quarterback sprinted all the way back across the field and out of bounds right at the first-down marker.
  • He blocked a shot out of bounds and lobbied for possession.
(Of a place) outside the limits of where one is permitted to be: his kitchen was out of bounds to me at mealtimes
More example sentences
  • The Bellary Road, which has been earmarked for the parking of VIP vehicles, has become a restricted area, out of bounds to other commuters.
  • The main car park at the 900-acre Bishop Wood, near Selby, is now out of bounds to motorists.
  • A quarter of the playground is still out of bounds to children until resurfacing work, at an estimated cost of £1, 000, is carried out.
Synonyms
off limits, restricted, closed off;
forbidden, banned, proscribed, illegal, illicit, unlawful, unacceptable, taboo
informal no go
rare non licet
Beyond what is acceptable: Paul felt that this conversation was getting out of bounds
More example sentences
  • For him, all personal experience is grist to the writer's mill; nothing is taboo or out of bounds.
  • For the busy lady this posed something of a nightmare as sandwiches were forbidden and a nice plate of pasta with sauce was out of bounds.
  • There's something fantastically liberating in the licence she gives you to laugh at subjects usually out of bounds.

Definition of bound in:

There are 4 main definitions of bound in English:

bound3

Syllabification: bound
Pronunciation: /bound
 
/

adjective

1Heading toward somewhere: trains bound for Chicago [in combination]: the three moon-bound astronauts
More example sentences
  • That where he is bound come April 5, when he will attempt to better his brave fourth place in last year's National.
  • Much to my delight, the traffic was heading in the other direction and I had the northern bound freeway to myself.
  • But how many minutes will the bench - bound Italian with the stylised facial hair play against the Koreans?
1.1Destined or likely to have a specified experience: they were bound for disaster
More example sentences
  • While these students are likely not bound for careers in music, they are the future core of the volunteer choir, the town band and the community orchestra.
  • Although we can see that it is bound for failure, it is fascinating to follow its journey.
  • Any attempt at explaining higher meanings to be derived from Judo is bound for failure.

Origin

Middle English boun (in the sense 'ready, dressed'), from Old Norse búinn, past participle of búa 'get ready'; the final -d is euphonic, or influenced by bound4.

Definition of bound in:

There are 4 main definitions of bound in English:

bound4

Syllabification: bound
Pronunciation: /bound
 
/
past and past participle of bind.

adjective

Back to top  
1 [in combination] Restricted or confined to a specified place: his job kept him city-bound
Synonyms
tied, chained, fettered, shackled, secured, tied up
1.1Prevented from operating normally by the specified conditions: blizzard-bound Boston
More example sentences
  • Traditionally, they are duty bound to defer to the wishes of their parents.
  • Then you're duty bound to do the right thing so you just do what you're told and get on with it.
  • The Department was duty bound to protect the interests of the members who had contributed to this amount.
2 [with infinitive] Certain to do or have something: there is bound to be a change of plan
Synonyms
certain, sure, very likely, destined, fated, doomed
2.1Obliged by law, circumstances, or duty to do something: I’m bound to do what I can to help Sam I’m bound to say that I’m not sure
Synonyms
obligated, obliged, compelled, required, constrained, forced
3 [in combination] (Of a book) having a specified binding: fine leather-bound books
4 Linguistics (Of a morpheme) unable to occur alone, e.g., dis- in dismount.
More example sentences
  • An analogous account can be given of many of the bound morphemes of English and other languages.
  • Thus, the question of whether the syllable status of the bound morpheme may affect the base-suffix segmentation was examined.
  • The result is a bound phrase, in the parlance of linguists, that takes its meaning from the context in which it is used.

Phrases

bound up in

Focusing on, to the exclusion of all else: she was too bound up in her own misery to care that other people were hurt

bound up with (or in)

Closely connected with or related to: democracy is bound up with a measure of economic and social equality
More example sentences
  • The outcome of an act of discipline is closely bound up with how a child experiences that relationship.
  • Let me warn you to remember that the salvation of your soul, and nothing less, is closely bound up with the subject.
  • It's too big a subject - too bound up with who I was, who I wanted to be and who I've become.
Synonyms
connected, linked, tied, united, allied

Definition of bound in: