Definition of buffoon in English:

buffoon

Syllabification: buf·foon
Pronunciation: /bəˈfo͞on
 
/

noun

Derivatives

buffoonish

adjective
More example sentences
  • It's as if these two sides of his character, the passion and the buffoonish clumsiness are interlocked, as if he's a pan that's continually on the verge of boiling over.
  • The transition from buffoonish to sinister is seamless.
  • I can never be sure whether I come across as witty or buffoonish at work.

Origin

mid 16th century: from French bouffon, from Italian buffone, from medieval Latin buffo 'clown'. Originally recorded as a rare Scots word for a kind of pantomime dance, the term later (late 16th century) denoted a professional jester.

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