There are 3 definitions of bunk in English:

bunk1

Syllabification: bunk
Pronunciation: /bəNGk
 
/

noun

  • A narrow shelflike bed, typically one of two or more arranged one on top of the other.
    More example sentences
    • Some of the crew went off-shift, stringing up hybrid bunks and hammocks belowdecks, the others continued working.
    • Inside it's designed as the cabin of a ship: the bunks used to be hammocks and, even when they changed to something more solid, they were famous for having three tiers.
    • Few pirates were in there, snoozing deeply in their bunks or hammocks.
    Synonyms

verb

[no object] chiefly North American Back to top  
  • Sleep in a narrow berth or improvised bed, typically in shared quarters as a temporary arrangement: they bunk together in the dormitory
    More example sentences
    • The Queenslanders were sleeping in cars or bunking in caravan parks.
    • ‘Sure,’ I said, ‘I probably should know what you do if we're going to be bunking together.’
    • Baker, Pease, Broadwater, and Lieutenant Charles B. Schofield bunked together in another tent.

Origin

mid 18th century: of unknown origin; perhaps related to bunker.

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Word of the day skosh
Pronunciation: skōSH
noun
a small amount; a little

There are 3 definitions of bunk in English:

bunk2

Syllabification: bunk
Pronunciation: /
 
bəNGk/

noun

informal
  • Nonsense: anyone with a brain cell would never believe such bunk
    More example sentences
    • We like to believe that history is bunk because we don't like being bound by it.
    • That he believes his own bunk is the best joke of all.
    • Certainly there is as much bunk out there that needs to be unmasked as nonsense or lies.

Origin

early 20th century: abbreviation of bunkum.

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There are 3 definitions of bunk in English:

bunk3

Line breaks: bunk

Entry from British & World English dictionary

verb

[no object] (bunk off) British informal
  • Abscond or play truant from school or work: he bunked off school all week

Phrases

do a bunk

informal Make a hurried or furtive departure or escape.

Origin

mid 19th century: of unknown origin.

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