Definition of cackle in English:

cackle

Syllabification: cack·le
Pronunciation: /ˈkakəl
 
/

verb

[no object]
1(Of a bird, typically a hen or goose) give a raucous, clucking cry: the hen was cackling as if demented (as adjective cackling) cackling, whooping cries
More example sentences
  • Some have suggested that hens cackle to announce to roosters their renewed receptivity to mating.
  • And you'll not hear a pig grunting or a hen cackling in many farmyards today.
  • That's why I'm pushing so hard to get side jobs now, while the goose is still cackling.
Synonyms
squawk, cluck, gabble
1.1Make a harsh, raucous sound when laughing: she cackled with laughter [with direct speech]: “Ah ha!” he cackled
More example sentences
  • The woman in the stall next to mine was belly laughing, cackling like a crazed hyena, heehawing at the other woman's fart.
  • They pointed at the team on the field and laughed and cackled and rolled around on the floor clutching their stomachs.
  • Scarlet cackled out loud and broke her embrace.
Synonyms
laugh loudly, guffaw, chortle, chuckle

noun

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1The raucous clucking cry of a bird such as a hen or a goose.
More example sentences
  • Small colonies went to live in the tall ash trees in Rhue and Dawros until finally there was silence and the raucous cackle of the crows of Banada was silenced forever.
  • They barely brushed together when a bird's high-pitched cackle could be heard from the trees.
  • The loud cackle of the roosting birds on the trees disturbed her thought.
1.1A harsh laugh resembling the cry of a hen or goose: her delighted cackle
More example sentences
  • He bellowed a loud, insane laugh that sounded more like a cackle than a laugh and lifted his goblet, spilling wine down the front of his long, untamed beard.
  • As his conversation picks its way determinedly from subject to subject, his speech is measured and occasionally punctuated by loud cackles of laughter or bursts of anger.
  • Not far away some woman in a house laughs, a mad cackle of a laugh.

Origin

Middle English: probably from Middle Low German kākelen, partly imitative, reinforced by kāke 'jaw, cheek'.

Definition of cackle in:

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Word of the day apposite
Pronunciation: ˈapəzit
adjective
apt in the circumstances or relation to something