Definition of callow in English:

callow

Syllabification: cal·low
Pronunciation: /ˈkalō
 
/

adjective

(Especially of a young person) inexperienced and immature: earnest and callow undergraduates
More example sentences
  • Sending off a bunch of callow lads because a few opinion-formers safely over conscription age thought it was a good idea and might secure the next election would have been outrageous.
  • A callow president had the sense to surround himself with people who had three great virtues.
  • He finds a way for us to root for the callow man, and even root for Martha and him to find happiness any way they can.
Synonyms

Origin

Old English calu 'bald'; probably from Latin calvus 'bald'. This was extended to mean 'unfledged', which led to the present sense 'immature'.

Derivatives

callowly

adverb
More example sentences
  • It begins by evoking the glamorous life of a young woman who lives happily if callowly in a cocoon of utter fabulousness.
  • He smiled and callowly looked down for a moment.
  • It was my first encounter with a particular kind of reality, which my religion, my upbringing, and the callowly romantic cast of my mind had declared obscene.

callowness

noun
More example sentences
  • Patch Darragh has an aw-shucks quality that does fine at capturing Romeo's callowness and naïveté.
  • The callowness now on display goes a long way toward explaining why politicians and the media are held in public esteem somewhere above child molesters and below bankers.
  • To overcome the obvious disadvantages of such callowness, standout toughness or really remarkable talent are required.

Definition of callow in:

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Word of the day retroflex
Pronunciation: ˈretrəˌfleks
adjective
turned backward