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canyon

Syllabification: can·yon
Pronunciation: /ˈkanyən
 
/

Definition of canyon in English:

noun

A deep gorge, typically one with a river flowing through it.
Example sentences
  • The trip passes by waterfalls, forests, canyons, valleys, sinkholes and caves.
  • Oak woodland develops best in moist, protected canyons and valleys with deep alluvial soils.
  • Towering bridges crossed creeks, ravines and canyons, while down below huge waves swept across rocks and deserted beaches.
Synonyms

Origin

mid 19th century: from Spanish cañón 'tube', based on Latin canna 'reed, cane'.

More
  • cannon from (Late Middle English):

    This large heavy piece of artillery derives its name from French canon, from Italian cannone ‘large tube’, from canna ‘cane, reed, tube’. Soldiers have been called cannon fodder, no more than material to be used up in war, since the late 19th century—the expression is a translation of German Kanonenfutter. Shakespeare did encapsulate a similar idea much earlier, with his phrase ‘food for powder’ in Henry IV Part 1. Canna or its Greek equivalent kanna is the base of a number of other words in English, as well as giving us the name of the canna lily (mid 17th century), which gets its name from the shape of its leaves. Some reflect the use of the plants for making things, some their hollow stems. Canes (Middle English) are basically the same plant. Canister (Late Middle English) was originally a basket from Latin canistrum ‘basket for bread, fruit, or flowers’, from Greek kanastron ‘wicker basket’, from kanna. Canal (Late Middle English) and channel (Middle English) both come via French from Latin canalis ‘pipe, groove, channel’ from canna, and share a source with the Italian pasta cannelloni (mid 19th century). The medical cannula (late 17th century) was originally a ‘small reed’; a canyon (mid 19th century) is from Spanish cañón ‘tube’ from canna.

Words that rhyme with canyon

cañon, companion

Definition of canyon in:

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