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carnage

Syllabification: car·nage
Pronunciation: /ˈkärnij
 
/

Definition of carnage in English:

noun

The killing of a large number of people.
Example sentences
  • For this day of carnage and tears there can be no justification or excuse.
  • In the Philippines campaign, the fight to liberate Manila ended in carnage.
  • The only problems I can see with the film are it's length and the will to show scenes of carnage on the streets of New York.
Synonyms
slaughter, massacre, mass murder, butchery, bloodbath, bloodletting, gore;

Origin

early 17th century: from French, from Italian carnaggio, from medieval Latin carnaticum, from Latin caro, carn- 'flesh'.

More
  • carnival from (mid 16th century):

    Originally a carnival was, in Roman Catholic countries, the period before Lent, a time of public merrymaking and festivities. It comes from medieval Latin carnelevamen ‘Shrovetide’. The base elements of the Latin word are caro, carn- ‘flesh’ and levare ‘to put away’, before the meat-free fasting of Lent began. There is a popular belief that carnival is from carne vale, ‘farewell, meat’, but this is mistaken. Other flesh-related words that come from caro include carnivorous (late 16th century), carnage (early 17th century), carnation (late 16th century) (from the flower's ‘fleshy’ colour), carrion (Middle English), and incarnation (Middle English).

Definition of carnage in:

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