Definition of caucus in English:

caucus

Syllabification: cau·cus
Pronunciation: /ˈkôkəs
 
/

noun (plural caucuses)

1A meeting of the members of a legislative body who are members of a particular political party, to select candidates or decide policy.
More example sentences
  • An opposition party's legislative caucus can coordinate its members in policy promotion.
  • Party members had no opportunity to comment on these radical new ideas because Harris never allowed the booklet or its policies to be debated at a party meeting or a caucus of Conservative MPPs.
  • The US intends to have carefully-vetted regional caucuses select members of a provisional national assembly.
Synonyms
1.1The members of a caucus.
More example sentences
  • ‘The caucuses should respect committee decisions, in line with the principles of professionalism and reciprocity,’ he said.
  • However, the caucuses of the Non-partisan Alliance and the TSU withdrew their consent yesterday, which resulted in an angry reaction from the KMT and the PFP.
  • Beijing has caused the two sides of the Strait to drift further apart and seriously hurt the feelings of the Taiwanese people, the caucus said in a statement.
2A group of people with shared concerns within a political party or larger organization.
More example sentences
  • During the eighties and nineties, self-defined conservative caucuses and organizations have operated within the Republican Party inside and outside of Congress.
  • He took it to his caucus of other Communist Party of India activists in and around the university and they are translating it into Hindi.
  • There is a caucus within the ruling Liberal Party who believe Canada ought to listen to Walters.
Synonyms
members, party, faction, camp, bloc, group, set, band, ring, cabal, coterie, pressure group

verb (caucuses, caucusing, caucused)

[no object] chiefly North American Back to top  
Hold or form a caucus.
More example sentences
  • Inside they were all there, a big blob of nasty Iowans, caucusing away in one big terrifying ugly caucus.
  • Senator Hatch, the committee chairman, with five Republicans present, called the committee to order while the Democrats were off caucusing.
  • For starters, Townsend, a warehouse manager who also writes about arts, caucused for John McCain in early 2000.

Origin

mid 18th century (originally US): perhaps from Algonquian cau'-cau'-as'u 'adviser'.

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