There are 2 definitions of choke in English:

choke1

Syllabification: choke
Pronunciation: /CHōk
 
/

verb

1 [no object] (Of a person or animal) have severe difficulty in breathing because of a constricted or obstructed throat or a lack of air: Willie choked on a mouthful of soda
More example sentences
  • My heart leapt into my throat and I practically choked on it.
  • Alex's voice got stuck in her throat and she nearly choked on nothing.
  • She woke, and as the cry died in her throat, she almost choked on it.
Synonyms
gag, retch, cough, fight for breath
1.1 [with object] Hinder or obstruct the breathing of (a person or animal) by choking.
More example sentences
  • The dog snapped its jaws open and closed inches from Rae's face and he could smell the animal's fetid breath, choking him, causing him to gag.
  • I would wake up fighting and trying to prevent someone from choking me.
  • Sometimes referred to as a chain or choke chain collar, if used properly it should never choke your dog.
Synonyms
1.2 [with object] Prevent (a plant) from growing by depriving it of light, air, or nourishment: the bracken will choke the wild gladiolus
More example sentences
  • Could you suggest a strategy for choking the weeds and getting the field to a pure stand of timothy or a mixture good for horses?
  • In a SAC area if a farmer wishes to kill off the ivy that is choking his trees or menacing his buildings, he is not free to do so.
  • In most of the urban areas, the avenue trees are choked to death as the tree base is completely covered by concrete slabs, leaving little space for aeration.
1.3 (choke something down) Swallow something with difficulty: I attempted to choke down supper
More example sentences
  • As she dribbles halfmud from a closed fist held above his mouth, he chokes it down.
  • After a year or so I could hardly choke the stuff down any more.
  • Many bodybuilders cook up to a dozen chicken breasts at a time, choking them down over a period of days.
1.4 [with object] Prevent or suppress (the occurrence of something): higher rates of interest choke off investment demand
More example sentences
  • ‘This will no doubt become a factor choking the future development of the local real estate market,’ Hua said.
  • The noxious weed of clericalism has choked the development of a people's church.
  • Apart from choking growth in Germany, this increase had the unwelcome consequence of launching the euro at an inappropriately high level.
1.5 [no object] informal (In sports) fail to perform at a crucial point of a game or contest owing to a failure of nerve: we were the only team not to choke when it came to the crunch
More example sentences
  • The Eagles are another team I predicted would choke, and they haven't thus far.
  • When they choke, most athletes prefer that no one notices, that the world sees it as a defeat unbesmirched by an inner surrender.
  • For years, Olson presided over talented teams that were notorious for choking in big games.
Synonyms
underachieve, underperform, disappoint, lose, collapse, fall apart
2 [with object] (often be choked with) Fill (a passage or space), especially so as to make movement difficult or impossible: the roads were choked with traffic
More example sentences
  • Roads into the village were choked with traffic heading for the ever-popular event, which lined The Borough from end to end.
  • ‘The area is already choked with traffic but there is no solution to that in these plans,’ said Mr. Mayling.
  • The town is choked with traffic daily and the situation on the Northern bank holiday weekend really put the tin hat on things.
Synonyms
clog (up), stop up, block, obstruct, plug, bung up
technical occlude
3 [with object] Overwhelm and make (someone) speechless with a strong and typically negative feeling or emotion: she was choked with angry emotion
More example sentences
  • C'mon, I dare you to listen without choking up just a little.
  • It was an overwhelming, mournful piece then when the city was still in shock; yesterday, I found myself choking up repeatedly and involuntarily as I walked around it.
  • Two years after losing my best friend to leukemia, I could finally smile at all the memories, instead of choking up.
3.1Become or cause to become tearful or extremely upset: [no object]: I just choked up reading it
3.2Suppress a strong emotion or the expression of such an emotion: Liz was choking back her anger
More example sentences
  • By the end, you are left, like the lady from Flint, choking back tears of pain and fury.
  • The answer is nothing, but even if there was something to say, it would not have been able to come out of my mouth because I was choking back tears.
  • His voice sounded shaky, like he was choking back tears, but once he caught his bearings, he pressed his palm softly to my hair and bent to kiss my cheek.
Synonyms
suppress, hold back, fight back, bite back, swallow, check, restrain, control, repress, smother, stifle
informal keep a lid on
4 [with object] Enrich the fuel mixture in (a gasoline engine) by reducing the intake of air.

noun

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1A valve in the carburetor of a gasoline engine that is used to reduce the amount of air in the fuel mixture when the engine is started.
More example sentences
  • They are used in a wide variety of applications, including throttle cables, emergency brakes, chokes and air intakes.
  • TKS uses a redesigned carburetor with an automatic fuel enrichment system instead of a traditional choke.
  • If the vehicle sees cold, hot, wet, and dry duty as well as on-track action, the carb should have a choke and vacuum secondaries.
1.1A knob that controls a choke valve in a gasoline engine.
More example sentences
  • They would opt to have their vehicles maintained and repaired, resulting in an increased demand for spare parts including tires, batteries, and chokes.
  • I'd rather have a manual choke than an automatic choke, though.
  • Indeed, even if you drove an old Mini everywhere in first gear with the choke full out and the handbrake on, you barely saw the inside of a petrol station from one year to the next.
1.2A narrowed part of a shotgun bore, typically near the muzzle and serving to restrict the spread of the shot.
More example sentences
  • When you're buying a used shotgun or a shotgun without removable chokes, don't believe the choke designation on any barrel until it has been measured with a bore gauge.
  • For most 12-gauges shooting lead shot, turkey chokes have IDs of.665 -.640.
  • Because hard steel shot lacks the easy flowing characteristics of lead shot through forcing cones and tight chokes, older guns could not handle it without some damage to their barrels.
1.3 informal An electrical inductor, especially an inductance coil used to smooth the variations of an alternating current or to alter its phase.
More example sentences
  • They are widely used in transformers for the electrical power industry and for transformers, chokes, and other components in the electronics industry.
  • The HX1148 module features a centre-tapped inductor on the transmit channel for the most EMI-sensitive applications, while the HX1178 has both chokes on the media side.
  • Mobile phones, computers, electronic chokes and a model helicopter are some of the things that will be dismantled and assembled for the children.
2An action or sound of a person or animal having or seeming to have difficulty in breathing: a little choke of laughter
More example sentences
  • He laughed softly, the sound more like a choke than a pleasurable noise.
  • But her tears were not escorted with chokes or quick breaths, like before.
  • The light shone over the man's features, and Connolly breathed a horrible choke.

Origin

Middle English: from Old English ācēocian (verb), from cēoce (see cheek).

Phrasal verbs

choke up

(In sports) grip (a bat, racket, etc.) further from the narrow end than is usual: he choked up on the bat a few inches
More example sentences
  • Roberts won't be choking up on the bat anymore, something he hopes will allow him to drive the ball with authority rather then slap it around the field.
  • There's no choking up on the bat, there's no shortening of that swing.
  • Baker sees Bonds as a rarity because he generates so much power despite choking up on the bat and standing so close to the plate.

Definition of choke in:

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Word of the day apposite
Pronunciation: ˈapəzit
adjective
apt in the circumstances or relation to something

There are 2 definitions of choke in English:

choke2

Syllabification: choke
Pronunciation: /
 
CHōk/

noun

The inedible mass of silky fibers at the center of a globe artichoke.
More example sentences
  • Cut the artichokes in half and remove the hairy inner choke and any hard leaves, leaving only the tender base.
  • Beat the artichokes gently with your hand so that they open just enough for you to see if there is any choke.
  • With a sharp silver teaspoon scrape out the choke, which would later have become the beautiful purple flower if left on the bush.

Origin

late 17th century: probably a confusion of the ending of artichoke with choke1.

Definition of choke in: