Definition of choleric in English:

choleric

Syllabification: chol·er·ic
Pronunciation: /ˈkälərik, kəˈlerik
 
/

adjective

1Bad-tempered or irritable.
More example sentences
  • Even Maureen, who generally treats her choleric partner with girlish forbearance, at one point asks: ‘Why do you always shout like that, Rolf?’
  • While Ralph was the choleric loser, Ed was the lucky buffoon.
  • The negative side came about largely through his personality which is described as ‘occasionally choleric, quarrelsome, and given to invectives.’
Synonyms
1.1 historical Influenced by or predominating in the humor called choler: a choleric disposition
More example sentences
  • ‘Adding fuel to the fire’ is Culpeper's way of saying that the herb strengthens the choleric humour associated with fever.
  • Imbalance of the humours resulted in various temperaments, thus the dominance of black bile causes melancholy; blood, sanguine temperament; phlegm, a phlegmatic temperament; or yellow bile, a choleric temperament.
  • Rather, he is choleric in temperament: he is passionate, intemperate, and prone to rashness and anger.

Origin

Middle English (in the sense 'bilious'): from Old French cholerique, via Latin from Greek kholerikos, from kholera (see choler).

Derivatives

cholerically

adverb
More example sentences
  • Beyond saying that the book is nicely produced and offers some opinions that will have some typographers nodding appreciatively but others spluttering cholerically, I am not expert enough to venture an opinion.
  • Once cholerically opposed by classical financiers, he can now, as Baron Keynes, boost his theories in the House of Lords.
  • To use the power of the majority to cholerically abase and degrade such dissenters, however mistaken they may seem to be, will ultimately be counterproductive.

Definition of choleric in:

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