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choreography

Syllabification: cho·re·og·ra·phy
Pronunciation: /ˌkôrēˈäɡrəfē
 
/

Definition of choreography in English:

noun

1The sequence of steps and movements in dance or figure skating, especially in a ballet or other staged dance: the lively choreography reflects the themes of the original play
More example sentences
  • A simple piece with meaningful choreography that your dancers can perform well is better than a flashy number that's beyond their abilities.
  • Performing her own modern choreography at The Juilliard School rekindled her drive.
  • Seeing his choreographies is always a treat, but attending a talk at the Candian Centre for Architecture with American choreographer William Forsythe gave followers extra insight to Forsythe as choreographer and as a person.
1.1The art or practice of designing choreographic sequences.
Example sentences
  • ‘Librettists of that period would know very little about music, choreography or costume design,’ she added.
  • It is simply the acceptance of choreography as an art form in its own right.
  • Practically her whole life revolved around dancing and choreography.
1.2The written notation for a choreographic sequence.
Example sentences
  • Most of the original choreography has been lost, but the charming tale endures.

Origin

late 18th century (in the sense 'written notation of dancing'): from Greek khoreia 'dancing in unison' (from khoros 'chorus') + -graphy.

Derivatives

choreographic

1
Pronunciation: /ˌkôrēəˈɡrafik/
adjective
Example sentences
  • What would his ballets and choreographic vocabulary look like if his production budget had been as stringent as Balanchine's during the Forties and Fifties?
  • In 1948, at age 18, he made his choreographic debut with the New Dance Group.
  • However, few scenes are realized as dance action, and the choreographic invention is modest.

choreographically

2
Pronunciation: /ˌkôrēəˈɡrafik(ə)lē/
adverb
Example sentences
  • The first of three works on the New Classics Collection program, Appalachian Spring remained choreographically intact thanks to Diane Gray's superb staging.
  • Unfortunately, this adaptation of Dorian proved dramatically fuzzy and choreographically mundane.
  • I began to think choreographically, anticipating how action, use of space, and degree of energy would best enhance the photos, and the choreographer framed movement and poses as if seeing them through a viewfinder.

Definition of choreography in:

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