There are 2 main definitions of clamp in English:

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clamp1

Syllabification: clamp
Pronunciation: /klamp
 
/

noun

1A brace, band, or clasp used for strengthening or holding things together.
Example sentences
  • Start by attaching the flexible vent from vent-connection kit to the periscope vent, using the band clamps in the kit.
  • Then turn both top and bottom plates on their sides and put them together using large jaw clamps.
  • The extensions are actually part of each side of the saw clamp, riveted together at the outer end.
Synonyms
brace, vice, press, clasp;
Music capo (tasto);
Climbing jumar
1.1An electric circuit that serves to maintain the voltage limits of a signal at prescribed levels.
Example sentences
  • When the driving voltage of sense amplifier exceeds the reference voltage, the clamp drops the driving voltage of sense amplifier.
  • A clamp circuit controls the terminal voltage of the smoothing capacitor to a predetermined level so as to produce a power supply voltage.
  • Electrical plug device including optical plug and socket connectors, terminal clamps connecting to electric mains, and an electronic bus coupler

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Fasten (something) in place with a clamp: the sander is clamped onto the edge of a workbench
More example sentences
  • To make a bolt, a smith clamped the screw plate onto a rod of cold, soft iron and turned it down the rod.
  • I clamp a steel straight edge in a vise and just draw the surface over the steel edge a few times.
  • Plan your cuts so that the direction of the wood grain parallels the long edges and clamp a straightedge to the plywood to guide your cuts.
Synonyms
fasten, secure, fix, attach;
1.1Fasten (two things) firmly together: the two frames are clamped together
More example sentences
  • My hands convulsively clenched, my teeth clamped together, my nostrils flared, my lips curled, and a red mist descended in front of my eyes.
  • ‘What you mean is that you would like to stay the night’ Raven nodded, lips clamped together tight.
  • His hands clamped together between his knees, making his knuckles turn white as thoughts tumbled through his head.
1.2Hold (something) tightly against or in another thing: Maggie had to clamp a hand over her mouth to stop herself from laughing
More example sentences
  • Logan tried to get up, but her hand was clamped very tightly around his arm.
  • I screamed even louder, and then I felt a hand clamp over my mouth.
  • She opened her mouth to scream, but a hand clamped down over her mouth.
Synonyms
clench, grip, hold, press, clasp
1.3Maintain the voltage limits of (an electrical signal) at prescribed values.
Example sentences
  • A second clamping transistor is connected intermediate the input transistor and a power supply rail and has a gate for receiving an upper clamping voltage.
  • Using this circuit, the voltage at V m was clamped with the dSEVC amplifier and measured independently with a second microelectrode amplifier.
  • For good protection, especially for computers, look for a protector with a clamping voltage of less than 400 volts.

Origin

Middle English: probably of Dutch or Low German origin and related to clam.

More
  • clam from (early 16th century):

    It is not easy to prise apart a clam, and this tight grip lies behind the origin of the word. Clam originally meant ‘a clamp’, and probably had the same source as clamp (Middle English). There is also an English dialect word clam, meaning ‘to be sticky or to stick to something’, which is related to clay (Old English). It is also where clammy—originally spelled claymy—comes from. See also happy

Phrasal verbs

clamp down

1
Suppress or prevent something, typically in an oppressive or harsh manner: police clamped down on a pro-democracy demonstration
More example sentences
  • Police say they are determined to clamp down on bikers riding in an anti-social manner, on or off-road.
  • While the government is intent on clamping down on truancy, it is preventing other children from attending school with equal vigour.
  • The GN is also implementing its Tobacco Control Act that regulates the sale of tobacco to those over 19, clamps down on advertising and also restricts smoking in public places and workplaces.
Synonyms
suppress, prevent, stop, put a stop/end to, stamp out;
crack down on, limit, restrict, control, keep in check

Derivatives

clamper

1
noun
Example sentences
  • A large crowd gathered around the car, shouting ‘shame, shame’, and ‘move the truck’ at the clampers.
  • Personally, I believe the police, traffic wardens, clampers, etc would stop harassing motorists if motorists stopped breaking the laws.
  • Police are still seeking the driver who, after her car was clamped and released at a cost of nearly £100, grabbed the keys of the clampers ' van and drove off.

Words that rhyme with clamp

amp, camp, champ, cramp, damp, encamp, gamp, lamp, ramp, samp, scamp, stamp, tamp, tramp, vampfiredampheadlampwheel

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There are 2 main definitions of clamp in English:

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clamp2

Line breaks: clamp

Entry from British & World English dictionary

noun

British
1A heap of potatoes or other root vegetables stored under straw or earth.
2A three-sided structure used to store silage: a silage clamp

Origin

late 16th century (denoting a pile of bricks for firing): probably from Dutch klamp 'heap'; related to clump.

More
  • clam from (early 16th century):

    It is not easy to prise apart a clam, and this tight grip lies behind the origin of the word. Clam originally meant ‘a clamp’, and probably had the same source as clamp (Middle English). There is also an English dialect word clam, meaning ‘to be sticky or to stick to something’, which is related to clay (Old English). It is also where clammy—originally spelled claymy—comes from. See also happy

Definition of clamp in:

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