Definition of cognitive in English:

cognitive

Syllabification: cog·ni·tive
Pronunciation: /ˈkäɡnədiv
 
/

adjective

Of or relating to cognition.
More example sentences
  • Wittgenstein sometimes appears to be committed to cognitive relativism as just described.
  • Suppose, then, that a reliable cognitive process is one which is relativized to persons.
  • Kant distinguished between the matter and the form of cognitive experience.

Origin

late 16th century: from medieval Latin cognitivus, from cognit- 'known', from the verb cognoscere.

Derivatives

cognitively

adverb
More example sentences
  • Both count as cognitive values because they make theories cognitively accessible, comprehensible to our finite minds.
  • It is an interesting question whether any cognitively sophisticated, rational, self-conscious agent must experience situations of choice in this way.
  • This is the part of the soul where we find emotions, more complex and cognitively responsive than desires but falling short of the reflective abilities of reason.

Definition of cognitive in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day flagitious
Pronunciation: fləˈjiSHəs
adjective
(of a person or their actions) criminal; villainous