Definition of complete in English:

complete

Syllabification: com·plete
Pronunciation: /kəmˈplēt
 
/

adjective

1Having all the necessary or appropriate parts: a complete list of courses offered by the college no wardrobe is complete this year without culottes
More example sentences
  • It is not necessary to produce a complete list, or a closer analysis here.
  • Elements of each of those explanations may well be necessary components of a complete picture, but they are insufficient.
  • Finally, I added a complete list of archived postings by category.
1.1Entire; full: I only managed one complete term at school
More example sentences
  • The entire community is not complete without those with disabilities.
  • After two complete bars, the entire band returns, now dearly playing in compound meter.
  • If you invest before July, it should be able to run for its complete term and you should get the full benefit.
Synonyms
1.2Having run its full course; finished: the restoration of the chapel is complete
More example sentences
  • It is quite a relief to have it finished and complete - it's been on my mind since April.
  • The blasting and rock removal scheduled to be complete was not finished.
  • With digital media such work can even look finished and complete.
2(Often used for emphasis) to the greatest extent or degree; total: a complete ban on smoking their marriage came as a complete surprise to me
More example sentences
  • The other is the complete lack of finesse necessary to drive it.
  • Here we were looking at the blazing sunshine of the entire weekend, a complete contrast to our present weather.
  • A single wasp brought an entire factory to a complete standstill after it was spotted on top of a forklift truck.
Synonyms
2.1 (also compleat) chiefly humorous Skilled at every aspect of a particular activity; consummate: these articles are for the compleat mathematician
[the spelling compleat is a revival of the 17th century use as in Walton's The Compleat Angler]
More example sentences
  • As I read The Compleat Gentleman, I was struck by Miner's recurring point that, in today's world, compleat gentleman are few and far between.
  • Notwithstanding that only a few men yearn to be compleat gentlemen - to live chivalrously - the yearning is a constant, from one millennium to the next.
  • ‘I thought you were the compleat hippie,’ said one, expressing a common sentiment.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Finish making or doing: he completed his Ph.D. in 1983
More example sentences
  • After the finish, crews completed a 23 km road section to the start of SS11.
  • Davenport completed the finishing and other details on the metalwork.
  • Students who successfully complete this course receive continuing education units from the University of Maryland University College.
Synonyms
finish, end, conclude, finalize, wind up
informal wrap up, sew up, polish off
1.1 Football (Especially of a quarterback) successfully throw (a forward pass) to a receiver: he completed 12 of 16 passes for 128 yards
More example sentences
  • Hall of Fame receiver Steve Largent completes a pass for 11 yards.
  • First, get somebody behind center who can complete the forward pass with some regularity.
  • Shooting 72 still gives him a rush, and it's hard to believe any quarterback ever has enjoyed completing a touchdown pass more than Brett Favre.
1.2 [no object] British Conclude the sale of a property.
More example sentences
  • As it turns out I have a buyer for my property who wants to complete immediately instead of January as planned.
  • It stated that a copy of the agreement and side letter had been sent to the Claimant and that she would be able to complete when she had them back duly signed by the Claimant.
  • The tenant is given a certain time in which to complete.
2Make (something) whole or perfect: he only needed one thing to complete his happiness more recent box cameras complete the collection
More example sentences
  • The success of the second golf classic has provided adequate funds to complete this year's tasks.
  • The only difference being that the lead carries on above your head and in fact completes a full arc.
  • That is to say, randori provides the means to complete a painted dragon by filling in the eyes.
Synonyms
finish off, round off, top off, crown, cap, complement
2.1Write the required information on (a form or questionnaire): please complete the attached forms
More example sentences
  • Participants completed a short written questionnaire at the surgery.
  • Visitors are required to complete long questionnaires before being issued with an identity card.
  • Please complete the enclosed questionnaire as this will enable us to take account of the needs of your club in the plan.
Synonyms
fill in/out, answer

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French complet or Latin completus, past participle of complere 'fill up, finish, fulfill', from com- (expressing intensive force) + plere 'fill'.

Usage

On the use of adjectives like complete, equal, and unique with submodifiers such as very or more, see unique (usage).

Phrases

complete with

Having something as an additional part or feature: the detachable keyboard comes complete with numeric keypad
More example sentences
  • Get other family members to help write the family tree, complete with your new addition.
  • Once inside a staircase, complete with threadbare carpet, leads to a landing.
  • Its Bob the Builder series has been sold around the world complete with merchandising and even a hit single.

Derivatives

completeness

noun
More example sentences
  • Historians have stated that its completeness, setting, size and sheer magnificence make it the finest citadel on earth.
  • This study routinely collected data from databases in general practices known to have high levels of completeness and accuracy.
  • This allows for easy checks to be made for data completeness and coverage in relation to a defined impact corridor.

Definition of complete in:

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Word of the day demoralize
Pronunciation: dəˈmôrəˌlīz
verb
cause (someone) to lose confidence or hope; dispirit