Definition of conjecture in English:

conjecture

Syllabification: con·jec·ture
Pronunciation: /kənˈjekCHər
 
/

noun

  • 1An opinion or conclusion formed on the basis of incomplete information: conjectures about the newcomer were many and varied the purpose of the opening in the wall is open to conjecture
    More example sentences
    • At the same time, I willingly sign up to support longer-range conjectures about the place and purpose of social tools, in general, and explicit software networking technologies, in specific.
    • For the rest of the morning she issued conjectures about the change in her social status this swingset would bring about.
    • So we sat, the last few hours, thinking about the last few months and making conjectures about the future.
    Synonyms
    speculation, guesswork, surmise, fancy, presumption, assumption, theory, postulation, supposition; inference, (an) extrapolation; an estimate
    informal a guesstimate, a shot in the dark, a ballpark figure
  • 1.1An unproven mathematical or scientific theorem: the Goldbach conjecture
    More example sentences
    • Scientific theories are conjectures based upon interpretations of the data, and therefore are never ‘proven’, but merely supported or not by such interpretations.
    • He proposed a demarcation criterion that, in his view, made the distinction between scientific theories and non-scientific conjectures.
    • Everyone knows it holds true for every number you can think of but provide rigorous mathematical proof and you win yourself a million bucks - courtesy of the book's publisher, and in the process turn a conjecture into a theorem.
  • 1.2(In textual criticism) the suggestion or reconstruction of a reading of a text not present in the original source.
    More example sentences
    • He was as sparing with critical opinions as he was with textual conjecture - only about ten percent of his notes might be called judicial.
    • He is aware of the present trend away from textual conjecture.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
  • 1Form an opinion or supposition about (something) on the basis of incomplete information: he conjectured the existence of an otherwise unknown feature many conjectured that she had a second husband in mind
    More example sentences
    • Therefore, this hypothesis conjectures that population density should be positively correlated with patch area.
    • It was conjectured that a spiral walkway would have led around the hill allowing a procession to reach the 120-foot high summit for pre-historic ceremonies.
    • It is conjectured that natural selection tuned the average connectivity in such a way that the network reaches a sparse graph of connections.
    Synonyms
  • 1.1(In textual criticism) propose (a reading).
    More example sentences
    • As he conjectures that the story is not about the mutually longed-for tryst that he had read into her letters, he questions his own ability to interpret what is figured in a text.
    • There are several cases, however, where I have had to conjecture a reading of the text in order to make sense of it.

Derivatives

conjecturable

adjective
More example sentences
  • It is conjecturable that the temperature in these regions will increase up to 4°C.
  • It is a mix of threes & fours, at which I arrived when I wondered what other conjecturable particles besides tachyons may be conceived through the exploration of special-relativistic equations.
  • It is always the similar which is capable of knowing the similar; reason knows the intelligible things; science, the knowable things; opinion, conjecturable things; sensation, sensible things.

Origin

late Middle English (in the senses 'to divine' and 'divination'): from Old French, or from Latin conjectura, from conicere 'put together in thought', from con- 'together' + jacere 'throw'.

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