Definition of constellate in English:

constellate

Syllabification: con·stel·late
Pronunciation: /ˈkänstəlāt
 
/

verb

literary
Form or cause to form into a cluster or group; gather together: [no object]: the towns and valleys where people constellate [with object]: their stories were never constellated
More example sentences
  • Margaret, the protagonist and instigator, is a Caribbean immigrant who embodies a form of diasporic consciousness that seamlessly constellates Canada, America, and the West Indies.
  • One of the many folk songs constellated around the full-scale Byzantine epic of Dhiyenis Akritas has the hero telling how he passed through ‘the mountains of Araby, the Syrian gorges’ with ‘my four-foot sword, my three-fathom spear’.
  • You know, certain people are just more coherent than others, and maybe when they die, they don't get all blown apart, but have constellated a bunch of things around a certain core element of soul, and that inhabits something new.

Origin

mid 17th century: from late Latin constellatus, from con- 'together' + stellatus 'arranged like a star'.

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