Definition of convolution in English:

convolution

Syllabification: con·vo·lu·tion
Pronunciation: /ˌkänvəˈlo͞oSHən
 
/

noun

1 (often convolutions) A coil or twist, especially one of many: crosses adorned with elaborate convolutions
More example sentences
  • Their origin is not yet completely understood, although they are certainly related to convolutions of the intense solar magnetic field.
  • Phosphor is clearly named for the pale, luminous green that animates a thick, pythonlike convolution which winds up from the bottom of the horizontal canvas and takes several loops around itself before exiting at the top.
  • In this convolution, the edges of the blades in teeth 21-27 are serrated and show 15 denticles on each one.
Synonyms
twist, turn, coil, spiral, twirl, curl, helix, whorl, loop, curlicue;
Architecture volute
1.1A thing that is complex and difficult to follow: the convolutions of farm policy
More example sentences
  • More important, I still find it hard to follow the convolutions of the plot.
  • Carey satirizes literary culture, plays with archetypes, exoticism, and the convolutions of travel yarns, and evokes Malaysia and Indonesia with aplomb.
  • Surely we reasonable creatures could dispense with these convolutions?
Synonyms
complexity, intricacy, complication, twist, turn, entanglement
1.2A sinuous fold in the surface of the brain.
More example sentences
  • In people, nonhuman primates, and other mammals with relatively large brains, the cerebral cortex's convolutions permit its large surface area to cram inside the skull.
  • Called an endocast, the model shows a variety of features, including the brain's size, shape, vessels, and convolutions.
  • In addition, cholesterol depletion caused the convolutions of the basal membrane and the structure of the lateral membrane to be less complex and the membranes to be smoother in the DIC images.
1.3The state of being coiled or twisted, or the process of becoming so: the flexibility of the polymer chain allows extensive convolution
More example sentences
  • These fungiform structures are formed from a convolution of exocuticle.
  • Thus, the force required to extend and compress their convolutions is very low and stays consistent from part to part and over a wide range of motion.
2 (also convolution integral) Mathematics A function derived from two given functions by integration that expresses how the shape of one is modified by the other.
More example sentences
  • The disorientation of the filaments around fiber axes is also treated as a convolution with a Gaussian function.
  • This operation is accomplished in the frequency domain by making use of the fundamental mathematical relationship that multiplication in the frequency domain is equivalent to convolution in the time domain.
  • We accomplish this shift by performing a 2 - D convolution of the image with a 7 x 7 low-pass filter mask.
2.1A method of determination of the sum of two random variables by integration or summation.
More example sentences
  • The convolution method does not generate any new insight into what determines the value of [left angle bracket] Î ½ [right angle bracket], but it serves as a useful test case.
  • Data analysis was carried out using a nonlinear, least-squares iterative convolution method based on the Marquardt algorithm.
  • The convolution method increases the precision, relative to estimation of the individual linewidths by simulation.

Origin

mid 16th century: from medieval Latin convolutio(n-), from convolvere 'roll together' (see convolve).

Derivatives

convolutional

adjective
More example sentences
  • CS - 1 (coding scheme one) uses the same scheme as traditional GSM radio traffic: 1/2 rate convolutional coding that adds enough error correction data to the radio frame being transmitted to double its size.
  • In a transmission termination processing step, tail bits for initializing the registers in each recursive systematic convolutional encoder are calculated only after a final frame has been subjected to turbo encoding.

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Pronunciation: fləˈjiSHəs
adjective
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