Definition of croon in English:

croon

Syllabification: croon
Pronunciation: /kro͞on
 
/

verb

[no object]
  • 1Hum or sing in a soft, low voice, especially in a sentimental manner: she was crooning to the child [with object]: the female vocalist crooned smoky blues into the microphone
    More example sentences
    • ‘Lovely Leia’ my Mamma would croon in a sing song voice to me as I lay curled in her lap.
    • ‘We learn to communicate as babies through crooning and singing from our mothers,’ he says.
    • Further, Jake does not just sing, he croons, swoons, bellows and lets it all loose.
    Synonyms
    sing softly, hum, warble, trill
  • 1.1Say in a soft, low voice: “Goodbye, you lovely darling,” she crooned
    More example sentences
    • My mother's voice croons in my ear, ‘Darling, what's the matter?’
    • I spoke to him, crooning soft, comforting words.
    • But then, a peaceful, mature, controlled voice crooned next to them.

noun

[in singular] Back to top  
  • A soft, low voice or tone: he sang in a gentle, highly expressive croon
    More example sentences
    • Who, back in 1991, would have guessed that his clenched-teeth complaining-voice came along with such an expressive croon?
    • Kieran held the animal to the rapid pace with a soft croon of reassurance that Michael doubted he felt.
    • The vocals plateau at a whining croon throughout the most of the album.

Origin

late 15th century (originally Scots and northern English): from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch krōnen 'groan, lament'. The use of croon in standard English was probably popularized by Robert Burns.

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