Definition of cumulus in English:

cumulus

Syllabification: cu·mu·lus
Pronunciation: /ˈkyo͞omyələs
 
/

noun (plural cumuli /-ˌlī, -lē/)

Meteorology
A cloud forming rounded masses heaped on each other above a flat base at fairly low altitude.
More example sentences
  • When the air condenses into small, lumpy, low pockets of cloud, this is cumulus.
  • These types of funnel clouds form out of large cumulus clouds or very weak thunderstorms and normally do not have the energy to reach the ground.
  • The basic cloud forms are cumulus, which are heaped clouds; stratus, which are layer clouds; and cirrus, which are wispy.

Origin

mid 17th century (denoting a heap or an accumulation): from Latin, 'heap'.

Derivatives

cumulous

adjective
More example sentences
  • The spokesperson explained that heavy thunderstorms come from cumulous cloud, which go up to 40,000 ft into the atmosphere.
  • Above the mighty fortress of earth, dark cumulous nimbus clouds clash violently against each other invoking the worst of all storms and hindering all whom dare to cross by air.
  • We were both quiet as we watched the cirrus and cumulous clouds float aimlessly in the vast opening above us.

Definition of cumulus in:

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