There are 2 main definitions of curate in English:

Share this entry

Share this page

curate1

Syllabification: cu·rate
Pronunciation: /ˈkyo͝orət
 
, ˈkyo͝oˌrāt
 
/

noun

(also assistant curate)
1A member of the clergy engaged as assistant to a vicar, rector, or parish priest.
Example sentences
  • But in a letter to the village magazine, the assistant curate said the work on the windows had used up the funds available for repairs to the church.
  • Before joining Holy Rood he was assistant curate at St George's Church in Tyldesley.
  • His first appointment, after further studies in Rome, was as assistant curate in a rustic hamlet 15 miles east of Krakow.
1.1 archaic A minister with pastoral responsibility.

Origin

Middle English: from medieval Latin curatus, from Latin cura 'care'.

More
  • The word curate, ‘an assistant to a parish priest’, comes from medieval Latin curatus, from Latin cura ‘care’ (because the parishioners are in his care), the source of a number of words including cure (Middle English), curator (Late Middle English), accurate (late 16th century) ‘done with care’, and secure (Late Middle English) ‘free from care’. You can describe something that is partly good and partly bad as a curate's egg. This is one of those rare expressions whose origin can be precisely identified. A cartoon in an 1895 edition of the magazine Punch features a meek curate at the breakfast table with his bishop. The caption reads: ‘BISHOP: “I'm afraid you've got a bad egg, Mr Jones.” CURATE: “Oh no, my Lord, I assure you! Parts of it are excellent!” ’ Only ten years later the phrase had become sufficiently familiar to appear in a publication called Minister's Gazette of Fashion: ‘The past spring and summer season has seen much fluctuation. Like the curate's egg, it has been excellent in parts.’

Words that rhyme with curate

priorateelaborate

Definition of curate in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

There are 2 main definitions of curate in English:

Share this entry

Share this page

curate2

Syllabification: cu·rate
Pronunciation: /ˌkyo͝oˈrāt
 
, ˈkyo͝oˌrāt
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Select, organize, and look after the items in (a collection or exhibition): both exhibitions are curated by the museum’s director
More example sentences
  • He has had ten years of museum experience curating exhibitions, commissioning new works, and developing artist residency programs.
  • Plus, I am really excited to be guest curating a large exhibition from the museum's wonderful American Folk Art Collection.
  • Over the past decade, my father has been slowly curating a collection of AIDS posters from all over the world, for the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda.
1.1Select the performers or performances that will feature in (an arts event or program): in past years the festival has been curated by the likes of David Bowie
More example sentences
  • The Observer is media partner of this year's Meltdown festival, which is curated by Patti Smith.
  • It's a great insane ending to a brilliantly curated day of music.
  • The concert is part of this Meltdown Festival curated by Morrissey.
1.2Select, organize, and present (online content, merchandise, information, etc.), typically using professional or expert knowledge: nearly every major news organization is using Twitter’s new lists feature to curate tweets about the earthquake (as adjective curated) a curated alternative to the world’s most popular video portal
More example sentences
  • Blueprint is making one of the only serious efforts at collecting, carefully curating and providing information to scientists that would not otherwise be made available in a computer-readable format.
  • We're not interested in raw numbers, but ensuring that our valued customers enjoy and appreciate the curated news and the eloquent writers whom we employ, etc. etc.
  • It's a curated platform with 225,000 apps.

Origin

late 19th century: back-formation from curator.

More
  • The word curate, ‘an assistant to a parish priest’, comes from medieval Latin curatus, from Latin cura ‘care’ (because the parishioners are in his care), the source of a number of words including cure (Middle English), curator (Late Middle English), accurate (late 16th century) ‘done with care’, and secure (Late Middle English) ‘free from care’. You can describe something that is partly good and partly bad as a curate's egg. This is one of those rare expressions whose origin can be precisely identified. A cartoon in an 1895 edition of the magazine Punch features a meek curate at the breakfast table with his bishop. The caption reads: ‘BISHOP: “I'm afraid you've got a bad egg, Mr Jones.” CURATE: “Oh no, my Lord, I assure you! Parts of it are excellent!” ’ Only ten years later the phrase had become sufficiently familiar to appear in a publication called Minister's Gazette of Fashion: ‘The past spring and summer season has seen much fluctuation. Like the curate's egg, it has been excellent in parts.’

Derivatives

curation

1
Pronunciation: /kyəˈrāSHən/
noun
Example sentences
  • I learned some important lessons in curating video installations last weekend and hope future events like this receive better treatment in both curation and post-event publicity.
  • Her curation of the exhibition fused the pristine austerity of Chelsea minimalism with cinephile extravagance.
  • Her curation resulted in several outstanding exhibitions of visual art from the accession countries.

Definition of curate in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.