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damsel

Syllabification: dam·sel
Pronunciation: /ˈdamzəl
 
/

Definition of damsel in English:

noun

archaic or literary
A young unmarried woman.
Example sentences
  • The young damsel has been captured by baddie pirate Barbossa because she possesses a rare coin.
  • The story goes that a young damsel was at the top of the tower when she saw her husband gored to death by a stag he was hunting.
  • He would never sense the spirit, the gaiety in courting a young damsel.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French dameisele, damisele, based on Latin domina 'mistress'.

Phrases

damsel in distress

1
often humorous A young woman in trouble (with the implication that the woman needs to be rescued, as by a prince in a fairy tale).
Example sentences
  • Unlike many would-be damsels in distress, I never imagined myself being rescued by a knight in shining armor.
  • I felt as if he was my angel, and I was the damsel in distress.
  • Turrets, towers and battlements now look fit to accommodate any damsel in distress.

Definition of damsel in:

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