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de facto

Syllabification: de fac·to
Pronunciation: /ˌdā ˈfaktō
 
/

Definition of de facto in English:

adverb

In fact, or in effect, whether by right or not: the island has been de facto divided into two countries Often contrasted with de jure.
More example sentences
  • This annexation, similar to the de facto annexation of broad tracts of land, constitutes a flagrant breach of the right of the people to self-determination.
  • The statement underlined the impact of de facto financial sanctions on the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries’ second biggest oil producer.
  • The nature and characteristics of de facto economic integration are also crucially important and this book presents a deeper understanding of the on-going de facto economic integration in East Asia.
Synonyms
in practice, in effect, in fact, in reality, really, actually

adjective

[attributive] Back to top  
Denoting someone or something that is such in fact: a de facto one-party system
More example sentences
  • The court will also protect a child of a de facto relationship in the same way.
  • Simply put, in the case of a de facto national primary, long-shot candidates need not apply.
  • You want to be more involved in the child's court case and are considering becoming a de facto parent.
Synonyms
actual, real, effective

Origin

early 17th century: Latin, literally 'of fact'.

Words that rhyme with de facto

ipso facto

Definition of de facto in:

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