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deracinate

Syllabification: de·rac·in·ate
Pronunciation: /dēˈrasəˌnāt
 
/

Definition of deracinate in English:

verb

[with object] literary
Tear (something) up by the roots.
Example sentences
  • Behind that deracinated plant we see a landscape.
  • Her forms resemble the organic and deracinated limbs of trees and woody plants, but its anaerobic sterility makes a comment not on the inherent majesty of the environment but rather of its frailty in the face of human progress and development.
  • In addition they had numerous tired and sad specimens deracinated, to make way for the new goodies, including red, pink and orange flowered gums.

Origin

late 16th century: from French déraciner, from dé- (expressing removal) + racine 'root' (based on Latin radix).

Derivatives

deracination

1
Pronunciation: /-ˌrasəˈnāSHən/
noun
Example sentences
  • Our fathers presided over the ruthless deracination of political reportage in this country, and we intend to make amends during this campaign.
  • This fine novel of loss, love and deracination is set in the wetlands of the Somerset Levels in 1946 during one of the worst winters for decades.
  • She identifies deracination as the defining condition of the modern world.

Words that rhyme with deracinate

assassinate, fascinate

Definition of deracinate in:

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