Definition of disparage in English:

disparage

Syllabification: dis·par·age
Pronunciation: /dəˈsperij
 
/

verb

[with object]
Regard or represent as being of little worth: he never missed an opportunity to disparage his competitors
More example sentences
  • But when you're living with a person all your life, you, unknowingly, tend to disparage his worth.
  • Any overt public criticism or disparaging remarks can result in a loss of face and cause extreme embarrassment.
  • For years there were always disparaging remarks about the fact that Rangers had won another title.
Synonyms
belittle, denigrate, deprecate, trivialize, make light of, undervalue, underrate, play down; ridicule, deride, mock, scorn, scoff at, sneer at; run down, defame, discredit, speak badly of, cast aspersions on, impugn, vilify, traduce, criticize, slur
informal pick holes in, knock, slam, pan, badmouth, dis, pooh-pooh
derogatory, deprecatory, denigratory, belittling; critical, scathing, negative, unfavorable, uncomplimentary, uncharitable; contemptuous, scornful, snide, disdainful
informal bitchy, catty
archaic contumelious

Origin

late Middle English (in the sense 'marry someone of unequal rank', also 'bring discredit on'): from Old French desparagier 'marry someone of unequal rank', based on Latin par 'equal'.

Derivatives

disparagement

noun
More example sentences
  • The hidden progressivist agenda on this issue lies in the disparagement of verbal learning.
  • Then the campaign of criticism and disparagement of a good man, Mr Keelty, continued into the Tuesday.
  • In spite of the ongoing disparagement, the yellow metal has continued to shed its ‘barbarous’ reputation, taking out fresh 18-year highs last week.

Definition of disparage in:

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Pronunciation: ˈflipənt
adjective
not showing a serious or respectful attitude