Definition of doctrine in English:

doctrine

Syllabification: doc·trine
Pronunciation: /ˈdäktrin
 
/

noun

  • 1A belief or set of beliefs held and taught by a church, political party, or other group: the doctrine of predestination
    More example sentences
    • Some other missionaries may have just been concerned to teach the doctrines of the church.
    • It attained some popularity due to a mistaken belief that it taught orthodox Mahyna doctrines, such as emptiness.
    • Both groups continue to perpetuate the old and outworn doctrines of party politics.
    Synonyms
    creed, credo, dogma, belief, teaching, ideology; tenet, maxim, canon, principle, precept
  • 1.1US A stated principle of government policy, mainly in foreign or military affairs: the Monroe Doctrine
    More example sentences
    • He demonstrates that the Bush doctrine is connected with the spread of neoliberalism and global capital.
    • Are we discussing the Powell doctrine, or is this a critique of what's going on in the world right now?
    • The conquest of Iraq was the first test of the Bush doctrine of preventive war.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French, from Latin doctrina 'teaching, learning', from doctor 'teacher', from docere 'teach'.

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