There are 4 definitions of down in English:

down1

Syllabification: down
Pronunciation: /doun
 
/

adverb

1Toward or in a lower place or position, especially to or on the ground or another surface: she looked down the sun started to go down he put his glass down she flicked the switch up and down he swung the ax to chop down the tree
More example sentences
  • She put the wine glass down on the ground and turned over to face him lying flat, her belly against his.
  • Large pine trees were left standing but smaller silver birch and beech trees were chopped down.
  • Mr Rogers said last spring he stopped an attempt by the council to chop the tree down and believed it was now safe.
Synonyms
toward a lower position, downward, downstairsto the ground, to the floor, over
1.1At or to a specified distance below: you can plainly see the bottom 35 feet down
More example sentences
  • Armstrong and Aldrin had to jump nearly a metre down from the bottom rung of the ladder to the Moon's surface.
  • The objects from these sites were originally buried two to three feet down at the bottom of graves.
  • We were kitted out with helmets and miners' torch and taken 40 metres down to the pit bottom in a cage.
1.2Downstairs: I went down to put the kettle on
More example sentences
  • One gentleman has not been down at all to meet his friends.
  • Frank the Manc used to pop down from his attic flat with a bottle of whiskey and a plate full of samosas.
  • I got up, washed and headed down to the dining hall passing the site of last nights incident.
1.3Expressing movement or position away from the north: they’re living down south
More example sentences
  • She was heading down from the north and I was on a slightly earlier flight from London.
  • He converted hundreds as he made his way down into the South Leinster border area.
  • A few days ago I ran across an old friend who is now living down here with the new wife and child.
1.4To or at a place perceived as lower (often expressing casualness or lack of hurry): I’d rather be down at the villa I’m going down to the arcade
More example sentences
  • The police have also been down and we have discussed the night in detail.
  • He said he would meet us down at the club later that night, but he never appeared.
  • I never knew them well, only meeting them on rare occasions down at the seafront.
1.5British Away from the capital or major city: there are eight trains a day, four up and four down
1.6British Away from a university, especially Oxford or Cambridge.
More example sentences
  • My friends are down from Cambridge and I don't want you to antagonize them.
  • To work on the Times had been a vague ambition of mine ever since my Aunt Nell, with whom I used to stay while down from Cambridge early in the war, used me as a messenger to take up to London on Sunday night the letters with which she regularly bombarded her friends and relations in high places, one of whom happened then to be the editor of the Times.
1.7(With reference to food or drink swallowed) in or into the stomach: she couldn’t keep anything down
More example sentences
  • After the gig I just drank it down, poured myself into a taxi and headed home to bed.
  • They will take a glass of treated water from the outflow pipe and drink it down.
  • I am keeping my food down and this has led to my weight remaining constant, although by no means ideal.
1.8So as to lie or be fixed flush or flat: she stuck down a Christmas label
More example sentences
  • Her jet black hair was slicked down onto her neck and her eyes were sprinkled with tears.
  • They wrestled it into the back of the car… we had to put the back seats down flat to fit it in.
  • The back seats fold down but not completely flat and they leave behind a big ridge.
1.9 [as exclamation] Used as a command to a person or animal to sit or lie down: down, boy!
More example sentences
  • ‘Down, boy,’ said Carl, and Moose obeyed without hesitation.
1.10A crossword answer that reads vertically: how many letters in fifteen down?
More example sentences
  • People would be telling her to stop screaming as they were trying to solve 12 down on their crossword.
2To or at a lower level of intensity, volume, or activity: keep the noise down the panic was dying down at night it would cool down
More example sentences
  • If more than one wants to go to bed early, then the group should keep the noise levels down.
  • Club bosses have already turned the volume down and assured residents they would monitor noise levels.
  • I got there late, when most of the activity had died down and the light was beginning to go.
2.1To or at a lower price, value, or rank: output was down by 20 percent soup is down from 59 cents to 49 cents
More example sentences
  • Such subsidies can often lead to over production, which in turn forces prices down.
  • My latest statement shows that it is now worth less than I have paid in so far, because the unit price has gone down.
  • Ms Foley said it was now clear that public and media pressure had paid off in keeping the prices down.
2.2To a finer consistency, a smaller amount or size, or a simpler or more basic state: I must slim down a bit a formal statement that can’t be edited down thin down an oil-based paint with spirits
More example sentences
  • It would cut the size of your pages down by a fair bit, and be a bit easier to write.
  • As always, the interview's been heavily compressed to keep the file size down.
  • Dissolve the sugar in a little water over a high heat and boil the resulting syrup down to the softball stage.
2.3From an earlier to a later point in time or order: everyone, from the president down to the guy selling hot dogs, is outraged
More example sentences
  • I would dearly love to know where it is and have it passed over to me so that I can pass it down to my family.
  • He also wants them returned so he can keep them in the family and pass them down to his son.
  • Amanda says that she has passed the recycling bug down to her daughter.
3In or into a weaker or worse position, mood, or condition: the scandal brought down the government he was down with the flu
More example sentences
  • A couple whose baby was struck down with meningitis on their wedding day were today bringing their son home.
  • A SIX-year-old girl struck down with cancer had TWO dates with top pop stars on the same day.
  • But in May the plans were put on hold when he was struck down with kidney stones.
3.1Losing or at a disadvantage by a specified amount: the Braves, down 7-6, rallied for two runs in the sixth inning
More example sentences
  • At the moment we just don't look like losing, even if we go a goal down in games.
  • She retrieves the break only to go match point down in the tiebreaker when she makes a complete hash of a simple volley.
  • They attacked from the start, but went a goal down after a defensive lapse.
3.2Used to express progress through a series of tasks or items: one down and only six more to go
More example sentences
  • Nine down and six to go, Carlow and Naas are on track for All Ireland League promotion.
  • I think my body knows it's the halfway point of the week, with four shows down and four to go.
  • There is one down and two to go for Inveraray after their intermediate championship victory at Oban yesterday.
3.3(Of a computer system) out of action or unavailable for use (especially temporarily): the system went down yesterday
More example sentences
  • People lock systems down prior to test and as soon as test is complete the systems are opened up again.
  • Alas it's not sufficiently clever to hide it again when that app is closed down.
  • Banks seeking to have phishing websites located in China taken down face a language barrier.
3.4 (down with ——) Shouted to express strong dislike of a specified person or thing: crowds chanted “Down with bureaucracy!”
More example sentences
  • The protesters marched through the capital waving party flags and shouting slogans such as, ‘Down with absolute monarchy’.
  • It wasn't until her brother went to Europe on summer holiday and saw a U2 concert in Berlin in which everyone was shouting ‘Down with apartheid’ and ‘Free Nelson Mandela’ that it struck home.
  • A group of four men and women burst into a bank with a chorus of ‘Down with Capitalism!’
4In or into writing: I just write down whatever comes into my head taking down notes
More example sentences
  • I could spend the day noting down everything I did as I did it, and carry a digicam with me.
  • I did enjoy the research but the writing it down and trying to put it into proper language was hard.
  • Surely it's quite easy to note these things down and then type them out.
4.1On or onto a list, schedule, or record: I’ll put you down for the evening shift
More example sentences
  • If you did not put your name down for one, but would like one, please contact any of the members of the committee.
  • You see, the officer who stopped me in the City marked me down on his report sheet as Asian.
  • Sergeant Major marks me down as being present and tells us to fall out to the softball field.
5(With reference to partial payment of a sum of money) made initially or on the spot: pay $500 down and the rest at the end of the month
More example sentences
  • He says he will pay $1000 down and the remainder next spring when we give him possession.
  • She purchased the house for $89,000, paying 5 % down.
6(Of sailing) with the current or the wind.
6.1(Of a ship’s helm) moved around to leeward so that the rudder is to windward and the vessel swings toward the wind.
7 Football (Of the ball or a player in possession) not in play, typically because forward progress has been stopped.
More example sentences
  • The team likes his control and the way he is able to keep the ball down in the strike zone.

preposition

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1From a higher to a lower point of (something): up and down the stairs tears streaming down her face
More example sentences
  • As you walk down the stairs from Professor Safi's office, a large window gives a view to the north.
  • It is popular with elderly people and young mums with children who find it difficult to walk down the cliffs.
  • She also complained of a migraine headache but was able to walk down the stairs to the ambulance.
Synonyms
to a lower position in, to the bottom of
1.1At or to a lower part of (a river or stream); nearer the sea: a dozen miles or so down the Mississippi
More example sentences
  • He has never forgotten the time he boated down the Sepik River in Papua New Guinea.
  • It has stunning views down the River Necker and was on the doorstep of easily accessible attractions.
  • It was in that guise that he was captured in 1943, floating down the Mekong River in a bamboo raft.
1.2Moving or at a point further along the course of (something): he lived down the street I wandered down the road
More example sentences
  • The Woods live half-way down the street, the big yellow house on the left-hand side.
  • He lives just down the road and well and truly charms Carlos by describing him as super handsome.
  • We who live lower down the road can use the 846 but this only runs every half-hour and is often full.
Synonyms
along, to the other end of, from one end of —— to the other
1.3 informal At or to (a place): tired of going down to the pub every night
More example sentences
  • If I've been down the pub I can come home and stink of fags, which is horrible.
  • What would happen if a newspaper invited readers to an editorial conference down the pub?
  • Well, your phone will be with you tomorrow, and then you can pop off down the pub and show it off, can't you!
2Throughout (a period of time): astrologers down the ages
More example sentences
  • The endurance of the generation of 1914 was one of the wonders of human fortitude down the ages.
  • But the heart of the matter remains the same down the ages, and the consequences as dire.
  • It has been a standard, down the ages, for those wedded to other clubs but never those who love United.
Synonyms
throughout, through, during

adjective

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1 [attributive] Directed or moving toward a lower place or position: the down escalator click on the down arrow
More example sentences
  • Ascending a down escalator, I work at 140 watts.
  • We walked across the terminal toward the down escalator.
  • The jet in question was prepared for flight, so its flaps were already in the down position.
1.1 Physics Denoting a flavor of quark having a charge of − 1/3. Protons and neutrons are thought to be composed of combinations of up and down quarks.
More example sentences
  • At this energy level, only up and down quarks, the electron and the electron neutrino exist.
  • A neutral pion consists of a down quark and a down antiquark.
  • The new results promise to yield important information about the up and down quarks that comprise protons and neutrons.
2 [predicative] Unhappy; depressed: he’s been so down lately
More example sentences
  • Hutt was usually ebullient but this time, he came to my office, and he was in a down mood.
  • Have you been feeling down lately about your lack of knowledge of quantum computing?
  • If I had been playing badly, I would have been a bit down, but I wasn't playing badly.
Synonyms
3 [predicative] (Of a computer system) temporarily out of action or unavailable: sorry, but the computer’s down
More example sentences
  • I am sure they are all trying to email me right now, but the server must be down.
  • The website was down for several hours today because of a technical gremlin.
  • Most of the major news websites are down as they are flooded with traffic.
Synonyms
not working, inoperative, malfunctioning, out of order, broken; not in service, out of action, out of commission
informal conked out, bust, busted, (gone) kaput, on the fritz, on the blink
4 [predicative] US black slang Supporting or going along with someone or something: “You going to the movies?” “Yo, I’m down.” you got to be down with me
More example sentences
  • Then we got our friend who knew Schooly to call him up, and he was all down with doing it.
  • As long as you're good and you make people dance and laugh and have fun, they're down with you.
  • After speaking a bit, I asked him if he'd be down with an interview, and he was all for it
4.1Aware of and following the latest fashion: a seriously down, hip-hop homie
More example sentences
  • There's a lot of people out there who are calling themselves rappers but they're not really down.
  • The main character of this painfully hilarious racial satire stretches to prove he's really a down white boy.

verb

[with object] informal Back to top  
1Knock or bring to the ground: 175 enemy aircraft had been downed he struck Slater on the face, downing him
More example sentences
  • A military spokesman said the AH - 64 Apache helicopter was downed by ground fire in the morning.
  • On August 12, 1944, his P - 51 Mustang was downed by ground fire in southern France.
  • Up to 11 inches of rain fell in the southern part of the state yesterday, downing trees and knocking out power to thousands of people.
Synonyms
knock down/over, knock to the ground, bring down, topple
informal deck, floor, flatten
2Consume (something, typically a drink): he downed a six-pack
More example sentences
  • On the one side there were a group of 18 men downing drinks at the bar, seeking the confidence which only alcohol can provide.
  • Still chewing, Faulkner downs his drink in a single gulp.
  • She downed her drink and grabbed two flutes of champagne as she walked in his direction.
Synonyms
drink (up/down), gulp (down), guzzle, quaff, drain, chugalug, slug, finish off
informal knock back, put away, scarf (down/up)
2.1(Of a golfer) sink (a putt).
More example sentences
  • Home with two mighty shots, Murray downed a nine-foot putt to be all square.
  • Randhawa…downed his putt from 10 feet short of the green.
  • He hit a glorious drive and second to nine feet, then downed the putt for a 67.

noun

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1 Football A chance for a team to advance the ball, ending when the ball carrier is tackled or the ball becomes out of play. A team must advance at least ten yards in a series of four downs in order to keep possession.
More example sentences
  • That weakness should not be too great of a negative since the Texans typically do not use a nose tackle on passing downs anyway.
  • A defensive lineman sees about that much action in one series of four downs.
  • The offense has four downs to score a touchdown; the defense must stop the offense or get a turnover.
2 (downs) informal Unwelcome experiences or events: there had been more downs than ups during his years at the company
More example sentences
  • He was one of the first Americans to experience the ups, downs and pressures of fame in the public eye.
  • With it the French were able to conquer western, southern, and central Europe, experiencing downs as well as ups but winning all the decisive battles on land.
  • By her account, success is made of weeks, months, years of few ups and loads of downs - a whole lifetime of preparation.
Synonyms
3 informal A feeling or period of unhappiness or depression: everyone gets their downs, their depressive periods
More example sentences
  • I have a wide circle of friends, a wide range of interests, and, apart from the downs everyone has, a pretty darned neat life.
  • I was into the… I have a right to do what I want, when I want… phase and so, I had a fair bit of downs too.
  • I think that my job in a way, as Jon's wife and companion was when he had his downs and his bad periods, to say the work is more important than the recognition.
3.1 informal short for downer (sense 1).

Origin

Old English dūn, dūne, shortened from adūne 'downward', from the phrase of dūne 'off the hill' (see down3).

Phrases

be down on

informal Disapprove of; feel hostile or antagonistic toward.
More example sentences
  • To be fair, we were down on Episode III from the outset.
  • ‘Before I agreed to join Wigan, everyone was down on me and having a go because I was even considering it,’ he says.
  • I am going to be accused of having a down on female drivers.
Synonyms
disapprove of, be against, feel antagonism to, be hostile to, feel ill will toward
informal have it in for

be down to

1Be attributable to (a particular factor or circumstance): he claimed his problems were down to the media
More example sentences
  • The reason organic farming has such a small market share is down to two factors; price pressure from supermarkets which can make a marginal crop unviable, and lack of support from the government.
  • While they are willing to admit that some teenage eccentricities may be down to biological factors, they believe pressures imposed on them by modern society are also to blame.
  • But what we still are not sure about is how much of our performance at Imola was down to circumstances at the track that day.
1.1Be the responsibility of (a particular person): it’s down to you to make sure the boiler receives regular servicing
More example sentences
  • Pointing out that all such products carry clear age restrictions like those on films, they maintain that responsibility for censorship is down to individual users and their parents.
  • Earlier the court heard that the final decision as to what was contained in the maintenance contract was down to the person operationally responsible for the building and not design services.
  • We all have to take responsibility for it because what happened was down to everybody - the parents, teachers, governors, and pupils.
2Be left with only (the specified amount): I’m down to my last few dollars
More example sentences
  • Even companies which a few years ago were sitting on treasure chests of spare cash are now down to their last few billions.
  • Defence lawyers say Rupert was down to his last $1,100 when the FBI approached him.
  • Bruce is down to his last 16 available players for tonight's game.

down in the mouth

informal (Of a person or their expression) unhappy; dejected.
More example sentences
  • Yet he still managed to find something to be down in the mouth about.
  • It seems that City stockbrokers are a little down in the mouth.
  • She seems to accept it though and isn't getting too down in the mouth about it.

down on one's luck

informal Experiencing a period of bad luck.
More example sentences
  • But the sad reality is that there are lots of people from these parts who sadly, for one reason of another have found themselves down on their luck across many parts of Britain, but particularly in London.
  • These guys are down on their luck, they're looking to make money.
  • A couple of years ago I was really down on my luck.

down pat (or cold)

Memorized or mastered perfectly: she had the baby’s medical routine down pat a guy who has his art history down cold
More example sentences
  • I get the routine down pat, so I'm free to concentrate on what really matters - comedy.
  • Dion, too, has her routine down pat, leaving her house about 5pm, taking the stage about 8: 30, finishing around 10 and arriving home as early as 11.
  • He's got that curmudgeonly Elder Statesman role down pat.

down to the ground

informal Completely.
More example sentences
  • All of which will suit our approach to the game right down to the ground.
  • Sponsor Alan Ranger explained that the conditions in Poland suited Bolter's style down to the ground.
  • He had moved there from California in 1984 and life in the sunny principality suited him down to the ground.

have (or put) someone/something down as

Judge someone or something to be (a particular type): I never had Jake down as a ladies' man
More example sentences
  • To be honest I'd never really rated him that highly and had him down as more of a ‘reliable journeyman’ but this season his performances have been nothing short of outstanding.
  • The salon owner really has annoyed me, as he offered no recompense whatsoever, he's obviously relying on the fact that most women walk away meekly putting the experience down as just one of those things.
  • He obviously had me down as just another buddy to hang out with every now and then.

Definition of down in:

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Word of the day anastrophe
Pronunciation: əˈnastrəfē
noun
the inversion of the usual order of words...

There are 4 definitions of down in English:

down2

Syllabification: down
Pronunciation: /doun
 
/

noun

1Soft fine fluffy feathers that form the first covering of a young bird or an insulating layer below the contour feathers of an adult bird.
More example sentences
  • This soft down is not a real feather, but works as a temporary covering.
Synonyms
soft feathers, fine hair; fluff, fuzz, floss, lint
1.1Soft fine fluffy feathers taken from ducks or their nests and used for stuffing cushions, quilts, etc.; eiderdown.
More example sentences
  • I bought a down comforter to put inside the duvet.
1.2Fine soft hair on the face or body of a person: the little girl had a covering of golden down on her head
More example sentences
  • Every single women on the planet has 'down' on her face- in fact, it's what gives some women that 'perfect complexion' look.
1.3Short soft hairs on some leaves, fruit, or seeds.
More example sentences
  • Its leaves, which turn a deep crimson in autumn, are rounded and covered with down.

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse dúnn.

Definition of down in:

There are 4 definitions of down in English:

down3

Syllabification: down
Pronunciation: /doun
 
/

noun

(usually downs)
1A gently rolling hill: the gentle green contours of the downs
More example sentences
  • The hills and downs area seemed remote and edgy, in a way far from relaxing.
  • He added the last bit with a glare that went around the whole car, taking note of everyone's expressions as they neared their target, their faces growing grimmer as the flat roads began to move into the rolling hills of the downs.
  • From the village of Jevington climb steeply over the downs then descend to Alfriston, from where you climb again before turning south at Bostal Hill down to the Cuckmere Estuary.
1.1 (the Downs) Ridges of undulating chalk and limestone hills in southern England, with few trees and used mainly for pasture.
More example sentences
  • But the mainstay of the county was the sheep on the chalk downs around Dorchester and the cattle in the vale of Blackmoor to the north.
  • Situated on a spur on the western edge of the Wessex downs, Eggardon overlooks undulating valley land.

Origin

Old English dūn 'hill' (related to Dutch duin 'dune'), perhaps ultimately of Celtic origin and related to Old Irish dún and obsolete Welsh din 'fort', which are from an Indo-European root shared by town.

Definition of down in:

There are 4 definitions of down in English:

Down4

Syllabification: Down
Pronunciation: /doun
 
/
One of the six counties of Northern Ireland, formerly an administrative area; chief town, Downpatrick.

Definition of down in: